windchill factor


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

windchill factor

Etymology: AS, wind, air, cele, cold
the amount of chilling of the body, beyond that resulting from a cold ambient temperature, because of exposure to cool air currents. The windchill factor is expressed in degrees Celsius or Fahrenheit as the effective temperature felt by a person exposed to the weather. Because windchill factors are based on exposure of dry skin to cool air currents, air blowing at the same speed over a wet skin surface would cause additional loss of body heat and a greater windchill.

windchill factor

Loss of heat from exposure of skin to wind. Heat loss is proportional to the speed of the wind. Thus, skin exposed to a wind velocity of 20 mph (32 km/hr) when the temperature is 0°F (−17.8°C) is cooled at the same rate as in still air at −46°F (−43.3°C). Similarly, when the temperature is 20°F (−6.7°C) and the wind is 10, 20, or 35 mph (16.1, 32.2, or 56.3 km/hr), the equivalent skin temperature is −4°, −18°, or −28°F (−20°, −27.8°, or −33.3°C), respectively.

The windchill factor is calculated for dry skin; skin that is wet from any cause and exposed to wind loses heat at a much higher rate. Wind blowing over wet skin can cause frostbite, even on a comfortably warm day as judged by the thermometer.

See also: factor
References in periodicals archive ?
But it will feel closer to freezing for most because of the windchill factor, as cold air from the Arctic sweeps in.
Although daylight shines 24 hours a day during what is summertime in the Southern Hemisphere, temperatures have dropped to 100 degrees below zero with a windchill factor.
The windchill factor dropped to about 30 below zero at the 7,000-foot level.
The brutal windchill factor sank Comertown, Montana, to -52C.
The Premierleague leaders will (hopefully) have just returned from Dubai by the time the third round tie on January 25 comes around and the change from 30 degrees to a windchill factor of minus five will be hard to take.