will


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Related to will: William Hill

will

 [wil]
a legal declaration of a person's wishes, usually regarding disposal of possessions after the person has died.
living will advance directives.

will

(wil),
A legal document expressing the writer's wishes for the disposal of personal property after death.
[M.E., fr. O.E. willa]

will

Forensics
“The legal expression or declaration of a person’s mind or wishes as to the disposition of his property, to be performed or take effect after his death”.

Medspeak-UK
A document which sets out who is to benefit from an individual’s property and possessions (estate) after his or her death. It also ensures that the estate is passed as intended, after taxes and debts have been paid.

Vox populi
Desire or volition (as in the “will to live”).

will

1. Desire, volition, as in the 'will to live', see there.
2. 'The legal expression or declaration of a person's mind or wishes as to the disposition of his property, to be performed or take effect after his death'. See Advance directive, Living will.

will

(wil)
A legal document expressing the writer's wishes for the disposal of personal property after death.
[M.E., fr. O.E. willa]

will

(wil)
A legal document expressing the writer's wishes for the disposal of personal property after death.
[M.E., fr. O.E. willa]
References in classic literature ?
But the thing that made Will laugh most was, that the very fellow who did it got his trousers burnt trying to put out the fire, and he asked the is it Faculty or President?
"Either will do," murmured Tom, who was shaking with suppressed laughter.
"Well, he asked 'em to give him some new ones, and they did give him money enough, for a nice pair; but he got some cheap ones, with horrid great stripes on 'em, and always wore 'em to that particular class, 'which was one too many for the fellows,' Will said, and with the rest of the money he had a punch party.
"Well, between ourselves," said Tom, looking a little sheepish, but anxious to set his mind at rest, "she never will let me kiss her on her cheek, nothing but an unsatisfactory peck at her lips.
When she gets pale and dragged out she will probably change her mind."
Will would n't come up, he was so snowy, and Fanny was glad, because with her he was bashful, awkward, and silent, so Tom went down and entertained him with Maud's report.
When Maud came down and trotted contentedly away, holding Will's hand, Tom watched them out of sight, and then strolled about the house whistling and thinking, till he went to sleep in his father's arm-chair, for want of something better to do.
Guess I 'll go round to Polly's, and ask Will to drive out with me, and save him the walk, poor chap.
On the couch lounged Will, his thoughtful eyes fixed on Polly, who, while she talked, smoothed the broad forehead of her "yellow-haired laddie" in a way that Tom thought an immense improvement on Maud's performance.
I sometimes think I ain't good for much, and that seems to me the reason why I should n't even try to be a minister," said Will, smiling, yet looking as if with all his humility he did have faith in the aspirations that came to him in his best moments.
"Did he say that?" and Will's color rose, for the big, book-loving fellow was as sensitive as a girl to the praise of those dearest to him.
"So we will! Ned is doing well out West, and I 'm hard at it here.