wild

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wild

(wīld)
adj. wilder, wildest
Occurring, growing, or living in a natural state; not domesticated, cultivated, or tamed: wild geese; edible wild plants.

wild′ly adv.
wild′ness n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Genetics Referring to that which has been neither intentionally inbred or genetically manipulated
Vox populi
(1) Referring to a natural environment; not domesticated—e.g., animals on the Serengeti
(2) Referring to a lack of inhibition and self-control
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

wild

adjective Referring to that which has been neither intentionally inbred or genetically manipulated
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

wild

Relating to an entity, such as a virus, bacterium or gene that arises naturally or that comes from a natural environment, rather than that originates in a laboratory or as a result of artificial circumstances.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The film likewise neglects a contrast made in the book with a very different kind of wildness. Book and film both depict a sequence in which the children have a lethal encounter with a bear that has become a dumb brute--no longer fully sentient or ensouled.
Writer and Director, Scott Milwood's film, Wildness, has screened to great acclaim on ABC TV and in select theatres in NSW, Victoria and Tasmania.
He positions the rustic landscape representation "somewhere between the carefully wrought order of the formal garden and the forest or other wildness untouched by human presence" (xxiv): prosaic in its scenery and staffage, it is recognizably Netherlandish though not necessarily topographic.
When "In Wildness Is the Preservation of the World": Selections and Photographs by Eliot Porter appeared in November of 1962, nothing like it had been seen before.
The new king, who has attracted some criticism because of his checkered past and what some see as a failure to rein in a son known for wildness, was the late King Dipendra's uncle.
Through both she has experienced her own extremes, from her New Mexico wildness to her Minnesotan orderly stability.
The Symantec Anti-Virus Research Center rates this virus as having medium wildness, having high distribution, and causing high damage.
"Nature," Paul Cezanne wrote, "is in the inside." Today, in a world where the external wild has been all but exterminated, it is more crucial than ever to recognize that wildness resides deep inside each of us, forming a connection between person and place, civilization and nature.
Another minor problem is the author's tendency to express what may be universal truths somewhat pedantically: "Women naturally delight in wildness, even as men are drawn to gentle images of nature's playfulness" (139).
From a human viewpoint, and given how we're heading, we need to ask: Do we want to live on a planet that looks like New Jersey or England, with no wild animals, no rainforests, no wildness?
Settlers on this continent from the beginning have been seeking wilderness and its wildness. The explorers and pioneers sought that wildness because they could sense that in Europe everything had become locked tight.
There is still a little life left inside this body, a little wildness here and mercy and it is the emptiness we love, touch, enter in one another and try to fill.