elecampane

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elecampane

Chinese medicine
A perennial herb that contains inulin (a starch), mucilage, pectin, resin, sterols and volatile oil. It is analgesic, anthelmintic, antiemetic, antimicrobial, antitussive, carminative, diaphoretic, expectorant, laxative and sedative; it is used to treat gastrointestinal complaints and fluid retention.

Herbal medicine
In Western herbal medicine, the root and rhizome have been used to treat anaemia, asthma, dysmenorrhoea and lung infections, including bronchitis and tuberculosis.

elecampane

(el″i-kam″pān′)
A perennial herb (Inula helenium) in the aster family whose oils and ground roots are used in alternative medicine largely as an expectorant and diruretic. Oils from the herb have some antibacterial properties, but massaging with the oil can cause contact dermatitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
[18.] Togun VA, Farinu GO and RO Olabanji Feeding graded levels of wild sunflower (Tithonia diversifolia Hemsl.
[19.] Togun VA, Farinu GO and RO Olabanji Effect of graded levels of wild sunflower (Tithonia diversifolia Hemsl A.Gray) meal in prepubertal diets on the morphometric characteristics of the genitalia and some organs of Isabrown cocks at the pubertal Age.
sunflower fields lie near wild sunflowers that bloom at the same time.
[9.] Farinu GO, Odunsi AA, Akinola JO and VA Togun Yield and chemical composition of wild sunflower (Tithonia diversifolia) Hemls A.
Loren Rieseberg, a University of British Columbia collaborator, will compare their genetic profiles to those of American wild sunflowers. This could reveal whether the Australian sunflowers have undergone significant genetic changes since arriving in the Land Down Under more than 100 years ago from America.
Snow and her colleagues are continuing their research and trying to understand if wild sunflowers with beneficial transgenes could become troublesome weeds.
The Nevada desert is not at all like that - it's alive with colour, mile upon mile of wild sunflowers grow along the roadside and yucca, aloe vera and Joshua trees grow in the sandy soil above acres of bright yellow flowers that give the whole landscape a golden glow.
SUNFLOWER CHLOROTIC MOTTLE VIRUS (SuCMoV), a member of the Potyvirus genus within the Potyviridac family (Dujovny et al., 1998, 2000), is one of the most widely distributed potyviruses on cultivated and wild sunflowers in Argentina (Lenardon et al., 2001).
* Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio -- $230,000 to study transgenic insect resistance effects on wild sunflowers.
When researchers crossed these souped-up plants with wild sunflowers, the Bt gene passed to some of the offspring, report Allison Snow of Ohio State University in Columbus and her colleagues.
These plants include melons, cucumbers, carrots, chicory, wild sunflowers, herbaceous ornamentals, and shrubs, as well as species of Brassica and Cuphea.
Genes for resistance to the new race have been identified in cultivated and wild sunflowers and seem to confer resistance to earlier races (A through E), as has been the historical pattern (Vranceanu et al., 1980, 1986; Melero-Vara et al., 1989; Dominguez, 1996a; Ruso et al., 1996; Gagne et al., 1998; Sukno et al., 1998, 1999; Fernandez-Martinez et al., 2000).