wild

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Related to wild sorghum: Sorghum bicolor, sorgo

wild

(wīld)
adj. wilder, wildest
Occurring, growing, or living in a natural state; not domesticated, cultivated, or tamed: wild geese; edible wild plants.

wild′ly adv.
wild′ness n.
Genetics Referring to that which has been neither intentionally inbred or genetically manipulated
Vox populi
(1) Referring to a natural environment; not domesticated—e.g., animals on the Serengeti
(2) Referring to a lack of inhibition and self-control

wild

adjective Referring to that which has been neither intentionally inbred or genetically manipulated

wild

Relating to an entity, such as a virus, bacterium or gene that arises naturally or that comes from a natural environment, rather than that originates in a laboratory or as a result of artificial circumstances.
References in periodicals archive ?
Good physical condition is due to the soil A total of Allelopatic all levels to wild-treated roots Sorghum But in less than 100 percent and 100 percent of the treated Allelopatic treated wild sorghum roots that it has changed the speed ratio.
Assessment of various treatments of wild sorghum root extracts on germination rate and percentage of Zea mays:
Comparison of the effects of treatments, and red root amaranth plant was demonstrated both on wild sorghum had also caused damage.
This small collection of wild sorghums screened for potential striga resistance mechanisms allowed us to identify some unique reactions that prevent the parasitic invasion.
Subspecies Race Accession identity Species (Field reaction to Striga) GROUP 1: low germination stimulators (MGD < 10 mm)/ low haustorial initiators (MHD < 2 mm) Wild sorghums PQ-434 S.
In this study, we screened 55 wild sorghums and 20 cultivars for potential mechanisms of striga resistance using in vitro procedures developed in our laboratory.
The expression of ergot resistance in these wild sorghums was also evaluated in a greenhouse at Manhattan, KS, during the winter and spring of 2000.
Comparison of ergot resistance in wild sorghums and their male-sterile testcross hybrids with standard ergot-susceptible checks indicated significant differences among entries in Puerto Rico and the greenhouse (Table 2).