whole

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whole

(hōl)
adj.
1. Not wounded, injured, or impaired; sound or unhurt.
2. Having been restored; healed.
n.
An entity or system made up of interrelated parts.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this section, the wholeness of a polycrystal is presented as an analogy of the wholeness of reality and consciousness in Bohm's model [2].
The search for wholeness links historically to the African slave's search for freedom and agency during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in the processes of colonization and neo-colonization.
What was needed was some way to capture its wholeness and explore its force of attraction, its energy.
Simultaneity or wholeness occurred among Khing's thought, the right tree, and the appearance of the bell stand.
In other words, I am not simply dealing with a credibility crisis that requires my returning in penitential awareness to lost wholeness but a reconfiguration of wholeness in relation to others whom I have disregarded.
Jesus, in healing the leper and restoring him to wholeness, which is now expressed in the leper's life as right relationship with God, himself, society and his environment, exemplifies for us what it takes to bring total well being and wholeness to persons who lack it.
So, thanks to all our wonderful Friends of the Center, and all who work in ministries of healing and wholeness! We are in this together, and it is a blessed work.
In other words, we need to accurately assess the wholeness from which the building unfolds.
Mary Jane, a master teacher, told us a story to facilitate our understanding of the concept of wholeness....
He sees the beauty in each, values their strengths and finds wholeness where there is so often discord.
In the Bible shalom means universal flourishing, wholeness, and delight--a rich state of affairs in which natural needs are satisfied and natural gifts are fruitfully employed, a state of affairs that inspires joyful wonder as its Creator and Savior opens doors and welcomes the creatures in whom he delights.
In 'The Task of the Translator' (a commentary on Walter Benjamin's essay of the same title), Johnson argues that the wholeness of the work of art is an illusion which is always exposed in translation, the breaking of the vessel occurring 'the moment the signifier and signified are linked by the "folds" of a different system of differences' (p.