whole-life tariff

(redirected from whole-life order)

whole-life tariff

An order of life imprisonment in the UK handed to a person who has committed a particularly heinous crimes, in which the prisoner is sentenced to remain in jail, without possibility of release, until his or her death.

While trial judges can recommend the order, it is up to the Home Secretary to impose it. Since it was introduced in 1983, 50 people have had whole-life tariffs; four were released on compassionate grounds, due to advanced age or infirmity—e.g., terminal cancer.

Whole life tariff-eligible crimes
• Murder of two or more persons, where each involves any of the following:
    — Substantial premeditation or planning,
    — Abduction of the victim, or
    — Sexual or sadistic conduct;
• Child murder if involving abduction, sexual or sadistic motivation;
• Murder to advance a political, religious or ideological agenda;
• A second murder by an offender previously convicted of murder;
• Other offence that the court considers serious—e.g., treason, or combinations of the above.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Lord Justice Holroyde said that the judge was entitled to conclude that the circumstances of the crimes, truly dreadful as they were, did not require a whole-life order.
Adebolajo got a whole-life order and Adebowale must serve at least 45 years.
Mr Justice Singh told him it was "one of those exceptional and rare cases" where a whole-life order must be imposed.
He was given a 25-year minimum term after the amusement arcade robbery and murders, but the home secretary later increased the tariff to a whole-life order.
McLoughlin, who had killed twice before, was later sentenced to a whole-life order.
Court of Appeal judges dismissed an appeal in 2011 by the serial killer, ruling: "Even accepting that an element of mental disturbance was intrinsic to the commission of these crimes, the interests of justice require nothing less than a whole-life order.
McLoughlin, who had killed twice before, was sentenced to a whole-life order.
And they dismissed an appeal by Lee Newell, who murdered Huddersfield child killer Subhan Anwar while in prison, against the whole-life order imposed in his case.
And they dismissed an appeal by Lee Newell, who murdered a child killer while in prison, against the whole-life order in his case.
Lord Judge, Mr Justice Calvert-Smith and Mr Justice Griffith Williams declared that the interests of justice required "nothing less" than a whole-life order.
Lord Judge said: "Each of the attempted murders, as well as each of the murder offences, taken on its own was a dreadful crime of utmost brutality: taking all the offences together, we have been considering an accumulation of criminality of exceptional magnitude which went far beyond the legislative criteria for a whole-life order.
The Criminal Justice Act 2003 makes it clear a whole-life order would normally be the starting point in any case where two or more murders were committed involving a substantial degree or premeditation, or sexual or sadistic conduct.