tone

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tone

 [tōn]
1. normal degree of vigor and tension; in muscle, the resistance to passive elongation or stretch; tonus.
2. a particular quality of sound or voice.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tone

(tōn),
1. A sound of distinct frequency.
2. The character of the voice expressing an emotion.
3. The tension present in resting muscles.
4. Firmness of the tissues; normal functioning of all the organs.
5. To perform toning.
[G. tonos, tone, or a tone]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tone

(tōn)
n.
1. The quality or character of sound.
2. The normal state of elastic tension or partial contraction in resting muscles.
3. Normal firmness of a tissue or an organ.
v.
To give tone or firmness to.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tone

Music therapy A musical sound Neurology The degree of tension in a muscle Psychology The nuance of a spoken phrase Sports medicine The baseline muscle tension, which usually reflects the amount of training. See Muscle tone.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tone

(tōn)
1. A musical sound.
2. The character of the voice expressing an emotion.
3. The tension present in resting muscles.
4. Firmness of the tissues; normal functioning of all the organs.
[G. tonos, tone, or a tone]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

tone

The degree of tension maintained in a muscle when not actively contracting. In health, this is slight. Tone is abolished in certain forms of paralysis and greatly increased in others.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

tone

(tōn)
1. Sound of distinct frequency.
2. Character of the voice expressing an emotion.
3. Tension present in resting muscles.
4. Firmness of tissues; normal functioning of all organs.
5. To perform toning.
[G. tonos, tone, or a tone]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, he says, 'tonus, which means either "mode" or "whole tone".
Her argument is based around `the fact that notes FF and [g.sup.3] occur in the same sonata', therefore requiring a keyboard a whole tone wider than the conventional five-octave limit of the time.
The whole tone is secretly literary and resonant of Ovid and Apuleius.
"And this will have an effect on the whole tone of Hungarian national feeling." On Rumanian feeling too; under Ceausescu it would have been impossible for an ethnic Hungarian such as Father Laszlo Tokes to be invited to join the Cabinet.
And dedicated Franc believes finding the perfect dress sets the whole tone of a wedding.
"Let's have a little lovefest," he announced at the top, laughing: "That sounds so corny, I'm never going to say that on stage again!" But then opening with the rather apt What the World Needs Now is Love, and finishing on That's What Friends are For - not counting a final audience sing-along of Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head - the whole tone of the evening was happily upbeat.
Keeper Konstantopoulos admitted boss Aitor Karanka was frustrated at the stoppage time dismissal - as much by the whole tone of the game as by Nugent's rash reaction.
The fast sections feature a quirky motive in a quasi-latin rhythm, built primarily on whole tone scales with plenty of tritones.
The whole tone and approach of her consultation implies that all we need to do is answer "yes" or "no".
Part One covers all scales, including pentatonic, modes, Hungarian, whole tone, chromatic and diminished scales.
The whole tone of the letter is to me, somewhat hysterical, and conjures up in my mind the demented figure of someone jumping up and down on the grave of democracy.
''His whole tone is one of unbearable, smug condescension.'' (And that quote's actually from the Mail's sister paper, the Sunday Mercury).