whole


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whole

(hōl)
adj.
1. Not wounded, injured, or impaired; sound or unhurt.
2. Having been restored; healed.
n.
An entity or system made up of interrelated parts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 7: World Historic Review for Whole Grain and High Fiber
The Homestyle, Mesa Sunrise, and Buckwheat Wildberry are a mix of whole and refined grains.
Both variable universal and whole life options offer tax-deferred features.
Whole Foods seems to follow this model, as the initial investors bought in to the vision articulated by John Mackey (no relation).
And though it can be purchased at deep discounts if bought as a whole package, Ms.
Each in his own way buttressed Whole Language assertions that reading and writing were more effectively learned when they respected the innate skill students bring to the scholastic setting.
98-15, will require that a whole hospital joint venture be structured in accordance with the ruling's first fact pattern.
Along with the suppressed cartoon came an explanation from Howard Rheingold, the editor of Whole Earth Review:
Fifty-eight cereals have earned the 100% Whole Grains Stamp, which signifies that all the grains in the cereal are whole grains and that the cereal contains at least 16 grams of whole grains per labeled serving.
The services segment has the largest share of the global whole exome sequencing market, since it has a variety of applications in all areas, including diagnostics, drug discovery and development, personalized medicine, and agriculture and animal research.
Why give a Right Stuff to Barilla when you can buy 100% whole wheat pasta almost anywhere?
A recent study of more than 34,000 men found that those who ate the most whole grains (at least 3 servings a day) were 23 percent less likely to develop gum disease compared to men eating less than half a serving of whole grains daily.