white spot lesion


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Related to white spot lesion: tooth decay, incipient decay, Carious lesion

white spot le·sion

(wīt spot lēzhŭn)
First sign of demineralization of the enamel surface of a tooth; produces a chalky white appearance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ogaard, "The incidence of caries and white spot lesions in orthodontically treated adolescents with a comprehensive caries prophylactic regimen-a prospective study," The European Journal of Orthodontics, vol.
Key Words: Orthodontic treatment duration, white spot lesions, orthodontic band.
For white spot lesions in the cervical areas, a light-curing resin barrier material can be used.
White spot lesions during orthodontic treatment: mechanisms and fluoride preventive aspects.
Table I: Dental Hygienists' Knowledge of CRA/Management Knowledge statements True (n) False (n) Total n Dental caries is a * 86.1% (186) 13.9% (30) n=216 transmissible disease Dental caries is a * 97.7% (211) 2.3% (5) n=216 multifactorial disease An individual with a history * 88.0% (190) 12.0% (26) n=216 of carious lesions within the past 3 years is a high risk for future dental caries activity White spot lesions are * 41.7% (90) 58.3% (126) n=216 considered carious lesions.
Later, this technique was used for white spot lesions and demonstrated to remove the white stains on the enamel [11, 13].
One of the key problems that arises during fixed orthodontic treatment is the formation of white spot lesions (WSLs), as fixed orthodontic appliances increase plaque retention areas and make oral hygiene maintenance more difficult (1, 2).
White spot lesions represent areas of demineral- ized dental enamel and it is usually due to pro- longed plaque accumulation and colonization of aciduric bacteria.
Reducing white spot lesions in orthodontic populations with fluoride rinsing.
In orthodontics practice, white spot lesions are observed around orthodontic appliances with relative frequency.
They assess the caries preventive effect of slow release F devices [Bonner et al., 2006], F milk [Yeung et al., 2005], sealants versus F varnishes [Hiiri et al., 2006] and F for white spot lesions during orthodontic treatment [Benson et al., 2004].