white plague


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white plague

n.
Tuberculosis, especially of the lungs.
Medical history Infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the ‘robber of youth’
Substance abuse A popular term for the epidemic of cocaine abuse

white plague

Substance abuse A popular term for the epidemic of cocaine abuse

white plague

An historical term for tuberculosis.
See also: plague
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References in periodicals archive ?
Bacterial diversity and white plague disease associated community changes in the Caribbean coral Montastrea faveolata.
"if ever a thriller rewarded a reader's patience, it's James Abel's White Plague. its slow, heavily plotted first half may discourage you from staying the course, but near the end, when Abel's characters tackle a daunting mission, you'll push back bedtime and ask someone else to walk the dog." GERALD BARTELL
The ubiquitous "yellow band"; fast spreading "white plague type 2"; "hyperplasia" (distended polyps); aspergillus fungus on the sea fans; and some rare winter bleaching all graced our video screen.
And there are a host of signs of other diseases, some of which so far are symptoms without known causes: red-band disease, yellow-band disease, white pox, rapid wasting disease, patchy necrosis, white plague type 1, white plague type 2 and sea fan fungal disease, a terrestrial pathogen that reaches the reefs in runoff, perhaps from the Everglades.
At the time, more than 100,000 lives were lost each year to tuberculosis, or, "The White Plague".
A later work by Capek, his 1937 The White Illness (which debuted in America as The White Plague at Northlight Theatre in Evanston, Ill.
The increase appears to be closely linked to the rising incidence of AIDS in the United States, and points to the potential for a serious resurgence of the so-called white plague, both domestically and abroad.
The second crucial element in GAMP's program will be putting a stop to the white plague and the brain drain.