white muscle


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Related to white muscle: white muscle disease, red muscle

white mus·cle

a rapid or fast-twitch muscle in which pale, large "white" fibers predominate; mitochondria and myoglobin are relatively sparse compared with findings in red muscle; involved in phasic contraction.

white mus·cle

(wīt mŭs'ĕl)
A rapid or fast-twitch muscle in which pale, large "white" fibers predominate; mitochondria and myoglobin are relatively sparse compared with red muscle; involved in phasic contraction.
References in periodicals archive ?
A thorough analysis of the diameters of approximately 200 white muscle fibers showed that fish reared in cold temperature (22[degrees]C) have larger diameter when compared to culture at 28 and 30[degrees]C.
The liver, white muscle, body kidney, gonads, and anal fin fragments were collected in RNAlater Stabilization Reagent (Qiagen).
Hedges, "Effect of hydroxycinnamic acids on lipid oxidation and protein changes as well as water holding capacity in frozen minced horse mackerel white muscle," Food Chemistry, vol.
Effects of vitamin E and selenium administration on pregnant, heavy draft mares on placental retention time and reproductive performance and on white muscle disease in their foals.
3 THE young princess scallop also has a creamy white muscle, but has no roe.
Wearing a white muscle shirt over tight blue jeans and cowboy boots, the eternally suntanned Ernest would be by the entrance.
Starvation prior to slaughter in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) II: white muscle composition and evaluation of freshness, texture and colour characteristics in raw and cooked fillets.
Tissues of gills, white muscle, heart, liver and kidney were subjected to electrophoresis in Tris 0.0135 M/0.043 M citrate, pH 7.0 (diluted 15 times in the gel) and 0.18 M Tris / 0.1 M borate / EDTA 0.004 M, pH 8.7 (diluted 4 times in the gel) to visualize the expression patterns of enzyme and choose the most suitable tissue for the analysis population.
ISLAMABAD -- Scientists of the Life Sciences Institute at the University of Michigan have shown that growth of white muscle due to exercise can help keep blood sugar level in check.
In the laboratory, fish were thawed and tissue samples were collected: 2 samples of white muscle were collected from the left and right side of the fish dorsal to the midline, and 2 samples were collected of liver tissue.