whistle

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whis·tle

(wis'ĕl),
1. A sound made by forcing air through a narrow opening such as pursed lips.
2. An instrument for producing a whistle.
[A.S. hwistle]

whistle

(hwĭs′ĕl)
1. A sound produced by pursing one's lips and blowing.
2. A tubular device driven by wind that produces a loud and usually shrill sound.
References in periodicals archive ?
When she was a recipient of whistles she was embarrassed.
THE Duke and Duchess of Cambridge enjoyed a whistle-stop tour of Birmingham on Wednesday, including a trip to the city's famous Acme Whistle Company.
ACME Whistles, based in Birmingham, has been producing whistles since 1860.
On the school playground at Neath's Gnoll School, I was in the care of women teachers blowing on whistles while the men were away at war trying to blow up Germans.
amp;nbsp;Mancera said the whistle would serve as "a warning sign to society that something is happening there, that we cannot be indifferent.
This sort of critique is necessary if Lopez's larger project of countering and ending the use of dog whistles in politics is to have any chance.
Most CWDs in the Philippines do not use distress whistles, or if they do have them, people around them do not have the habit of responding to distress whistles, Nunez said.
All waterfowlers should have at least two whistles, the reasons for which I'll get into later.
In August 2013, WDP director Denise Herzing was swimming in the Caribbean with a pod of dolphins she has been tracking for 25 years, wearing a prototype of a dolphin translator called Cetacean Hearing and Telemetry (CHAT), developed by the Georgia Institute of Technology's Thad Starner, when one of the dolphin's whistles was translated as the word "sargassum" - a type of seaweed.
MULTAN -- Solid Waste Management Company (SWMC) distributed 100 whistles among sanitary workers working in the city.
When I was a farm kid in the mid-1950s, my dad told tales of Model T's with cutouts and whistles.
The findings are potentially able to explain familiar problems of other wayward whistles, such as the annoying plumbing noises caused by air trapped in pipes or damaged car exhausts.