whistle-blowing


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whistle-blowing

The act of informing superiors or authorities of another person’s alleged wrong-doings.

Medspeak-UK
Disclosure by an employee of genuine concerns about crimes, illegality, negligence, miscarriages of justice, or danger to health and safety or the environment, when these have been ignored or covered up by the employer or by a fellow employee.
 
Research ethics
Whistle-blowing in science refers to informing an appropriate party about concerns that a particular worker’s research is fraudulent, or has misinterpreted his or her data.

whistle-blowing

The act of informing authorities of another person's alleged wrong-doings; WB in science is used in the context of research fraud, alleged fraud or blatant misinterpretation of data. See Baltimore affair, 'Dingellization. ', Fraud in science, Qui tam suit.
References in periodicals archive ?
What's specific about the Serbian solution is the fact that it doesn't only protect the whistle-blowers, but also protects others who feel consequences of their whistle-blowing. This kind of protection is rare in comparative law, even though retaliation against a whistle-blower's associates may act as a deterrent (Thusing and Forst, 2016, p.
Ethical position of employees is a significant antecedent of whistle-blowing behaviour.
Both Robert Davies, head teacher at the time, and chair of the governors Chris Gore, admitted that during their time at the school staff had not been briefed on the whistle-blowing policy.
Whistle-blowing means disclosing organizational wrongdoings resulting in harm to third parties.
For that, even if the whistle-blower is protected by law (a worker cannot be dismissed because of whistle-blowing; if they are, they can claim unfair dismissal - they'll be protected by law as long as certain criteria are met), it is probable that many people do not even consider blowing the whistle, not only because of fear of retaliation, but also because of fear of losing their relationships at work and outside work.
Charles Robson, Head of Fraud Prevention Services at KPMG Lower Gulf said, "Due to the increasing realisation of the importance of whistle-blowing as an essential tool in an organization's anti-fraud and misconduct framework it has become integral to gain insights from subject matter experts in both implementing of whistle-blower programs and handling whistle-blower complaints."
The cables are among 250,000 being published by the whistle-blowing website.
The Social Partnership Forum and Public Concern at Work have published guidance on whistle-blowing in the NHS, providing advice on setting up arrangements that encourage an environment where staff feel comfortable reporting bad practice.
CROSBY-raised Cherie Blair's stepmother was branded a "f*** b***" after whistle-blowing about a "chaotic" charity where she worked as a teacher, an employment tribunal heard.
A case in the US has highlighted the need to protect whistle-blowing nurses.
Articles about whistle-blowing continue to appear on a regular basis in the popular press as well as in managerial publications and the academic literature (e.g., Delikat, 2007; Leonard, 2007; Rehg, Miceli, Near, and Van Scotter, 2008).