whistleblower

(redirected from whistle-blowers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial.

whistleblower

((h)wis′ĕl-blō″ĕr)
One who reports illegal, improper, unethical, or unprofessional behavior to authorities. The person divulging the information is usually an employee of the institution where the alleged activities occurred. Protection afforded to whistleblowers varies, depending on the nature of the misconduct that is alleged and the jurisdiction of the place where the event occurred.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
He said SEC investigations take two to four years to complete, and with the program's launch in August 2011, the next several months would see ripening results from whistle-blower actions started earlier.
Federally, the Criminal Code affords whistle-blowers the broadest safeguards from reprisals.
A whistle-blower is a person who tells the public or someone in authority about alleged dishonest or illegal activities (misconduct) occurring in a government department, a public or private organization, or a company.
Fellow whistle-blower Tom Hanson, also 49, said: "We are glad to hear after more than two years there will finally be some closure on this.
In Switzerland, the international anti-corruption organisation Transparency International enacted a confidential hotline for whistle-blowers, moves to implement legislation are under consideration.
In addition, each state's law would contain whistle-blower provisions that allow private citizens to bring civil lawsuits alleging fraud on behalf of the government and share in a portion of any funds recovered.
Studies suggest that whistle-blowers pay a high price in terms of damage to their careers and their personal lives.
A lengthy whistle-blower history exists in this country, from Daniel Ellsberg, whose release of the Pentagon Papers in 1971 sparked retaliation that eventually lead to Watergate--to Joe Carson, the eight-time prevailing whistle-blower at DOE--to Dr.
As for auditors of private or public companies, ignore whistle-blowers at your peril.
Whistle-blower retaliation claims have become increasingly popular, in part because of the post-Enron shift in the public's perception of whistle-blowers, who are now perceived as heroes taking on unscrupulous corporations.
Addressing the launch of National Poverty Graduation Initiative here, the prime minister said amendments would be made in the existing rules to increase incentives for the whistle-blowers.
Some, such as Githongo have christened themselves whistle-blowers, yet theirs is a work of fiction made up for whatever reason.