whistleblower

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whistleblower

((h)wis′ĕl-blō″ĕr)
One who reports illegal, improper, unethical, or unprofessional behavior to authorities. The person divulging the information is usually an employee of the institution where the alleged activities occurred. Protection afforded to whistleblowers varies, depending on the nature of the misconduct that is alleged and the jurisdiction of the place where the event occurred.
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Sometimes, the observation made by whistle-blowers may be correct but their conclusion in a case is incorrect," he said.
60% of whistle-blowers receive no response from management, either positive or negative
The settlement -- $13,200 of which goes to the whistle-blower -- also "ensures future compliance with reimbursement rules regarding emergency services for uninsured patients.
Since the program's launch in August 2011, the SEC has only awarded four whistle-blowers with money for assisting with investigations, with (http://www.
She believes the ordeals of the whistle-blower magnify the most pressing questions of the 21st century: What is it that we value?
That happens because some view a whistle-blower as someone sharing knowledge of misconduct for the benefit of others and some believe that a whistle-blower is acting disloyal to their organization.
Whistle-blowers claimed that hundreds of students could have been awarded qualifications they did not know they had or which they had not actually achieved.
Whistle-blowers claimed hundreds of students could have been awarded qualifications they did not know they had or which they had not actually achieved.
ZURICH: FIFA is to interview a whistle-blower from Qatar's 2022 World Cup bid over allegations that bribes were paid to African voters, Sepp Blatter said Thursday.
Your whistle-blower award won't be worth millions, but you'll have something highly valuable--a long career and the satisfaction of doing what's right.
Some of those are now filing whistle-blower lawsuits that can start criminal investigations.