wet

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wet

Military
A term used in spy circles referring to any spilling of blood. An assassination may be termed a wet affair, wet job, wet operation or, generically as wetwork or wet work.

Sexology
Referring to vaginal moistness, as in arousal.

Vox populi
Untried, inexperienced, green

wet

(wet)
1. Soaked with moisture, usually water.
2. A colloquial term for edematous or overhydrated.
References in periodicals archive ?
My eyes burned; I was watching algae wave in a shrinking drop; they crossed each other and parted wetly. And suddenly into the field swam two whistling swans, two tiny whistling swans.
Bonnard's paintings are full of light, but they are not exactly about lightness, and his touch is not light, except in the sense that the paint is applied thinly and wetly. But he is always present in his paintings, and his hand is always visible.
Charlie Bright comes at her, Corona-feeling-good, with the Dustbuster and she's giggling her heavy breasts shaking with the suction from the Dustbuster and he kisses her wetly and heavily on the mouth.
The snow was falling so heavily and wetly that the Pierce's wipers couldn't budge it.
And on the night I attended, the bedframe snagged Starveling's dog, which let out a helpless yelp and wetly limped through the rest of the performance.
And who among us hasn't at one time or another coughed politely, but wetly, into their hand before extending it to another as a gesture of friendship?
Poor old Edward is wetly joining in outside the door, but they are unaware of this.
I stood and looked out of my window onto this dark, autumnal night, The pavements glistened wetly, beneath the tall street light.
She walked into Polly's room and stared at her daughter, wetly sucking her thumb in a real heaven.
On a late fall Thursday, the streets slick in a light drizzle and the last of the season's leaves dropping wetly from the trees, Ammons and Cook have brought the two oldest boys for a doctor's appointment in an unlikely spot-a 35-foot-long recreational vehicle parked outside the boys' school, Webster Elementary.
His eyes are red, his throat is raw with hollering at the moon, and his hair straggles wetly down his cherubic face.