summation

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sum·ma·tion

(sŭm-ā'shŭn),
The aggregation of a number of similar neural impulses or stimuli.
[Mediev. L. summatio, fr. summo, pp. -atus, to sum up, fr. L. summa, sum]

summation

(sə-mā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of adding; addition.
2. A sum or aggregate.
3. A concluding argument after the presentation of a legal case, especially an argument made to a judge or jury by an attorney for a party as to why that party should prevail.
4. Physiology The process by which multiple or repeated stimuli can produce a response in a nerve, muscle, or other part that one stimulus alone cannot produce.

sum·ma·tion

(sŭ-mā'shŭn)
The aggregation of a number of similar neural impulses or stimuli.
[Mediev. L. summatio, fr. summo, pp. -atus, to sum up, fr. L. summa, sum]

summation

the production of an effect by the repetition of stimuli, any single one of which would be insufficient to produce an effect, as in muscular contraction where summation brings about TETANUS which results from a series of stimuli. See RODS and CONES CELLS for the effect of summation in the eye.

summation 

Increased effect produced by a series of stimuli applied either simultaneously or successively (provided the intervals are greater than the latent period). Binocular summation usually occurs when the two eyes are stimulated; thus binocular brightness is greater than monocular, except in the unusual Fechner's paradox. Two or more stimuli falling within the excitatory region of a receptive field will increase the excitatory response and similarly two or more stimuli falling within the inhibitory region of a receptive field will increase the inhibition: this is called spatial summation. The summation may also occur if successive stimulations are received by the same retinal region: this is called temporal summation. See complex cell; simple cell; receptive field; lateral inhibition.

sum·ma·tion

(sŭ-mā'shŭn)
Aggregation of several similar neural impulses or stimuli.
[Mediev. L. summatio, fr. summo, pp. -atus, to sum up, fr. L. summa, sum]
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* Weighted summation (WS) and Key competitiveness indicators (KCIs)
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--The final decision is made by comparing the weighted summation of local decisions with a decision threshold.
In 1946, Dennis Gabor, a Hungarian-born electrical engineer and winner of the 1971 Nobel Prize for contributions to the principles underlying the science of holography, published his now-famous paper "Theory of Communication." (2) In his paper, Gabor proposed that any signal could be expressed as a weighted summation of time-shifted and frequency-modulated (shifted in the frequency domain) Gaussian functions.
For that reason, the idea of the Gabor expansion is to express a signal S(k) as a weighted summation of elementary functions formed from Gaussian weighted complex exponentials that exhibit a corresponding Gaussian-shaped spectrum.
In the same way that the Fourier transform represents a signal as a weighted summation of complex exponentials, the Gabor expansion represents a signal as a weighted summation of windowed complex exponentials.

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