weight discrimination

size discrimination

Discrimination against a person based largely or solely on a person’s weight, height or both.
 
Size-related phobias
• Cacomorphobia (morbid fear of fat people).
• Gigantasophobia (morbid fear of tall people). 
• Zambianoliangioticaloigisticologphobia (morbid fear of short people).

weight discrimination

Size discrimination Social medicine Any restriction of individual rights, employment or academic opportunities, or biases against overweight persons. Cf Chubby chaser.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Right now, cases like this stand a chance mainly in Michigan, where a civil rights law has prohibited weight discrimination for more than 40 years.
Gender, age, and weight discrimination appear most frequently as secondary types of discrimination.
[52,53] This perceived weight discrimination would have arisen from weight-related teasing by peers and relatives, social exclusion, stigmatisation and body dissatisfaction.
Air transport unions say weight discrimination is a problem with some airlines who regularly weigh crew members to ensure they are within closely-monitored bands.
Results indicated a substantial proportion of middle-aged and older adults with obesity reported that they were affected by weight discrimination in their everyday lives (Jackson et al., 2015, p.
Studies reveal that women are more likely to experience employment-related weight discrimination than men.
Of special interest to those reading in the US may be the chapter discussing weight discrimination and stigma, especially the arbitrariness of defining being overweight (BMI number, e.g.) and the use of weight in job hiring and firing.
According to survey data, weight is one of the most prevalent bases for discrimination; weight discrimination occurs in interpersonal, employment, healthcare, and educational settings.
But assuming that discrimination accounts for at least some part of the wage penalty, a major issue is that weight discrimination is still relatively socially acceptable - especially compared to gender or raceprejudice.
They found that the 5% who experienced "weight discrimination" gained an average of 0.95kg over that time while those who didn't lost an average of 0.71kg.
Encouraging employees to reduce and control weight can be perceived as weight discrimination. In a survey of more than 2,400 overweight adults, 43% reported they experienced weight stigmatization from employers, and 54% reported weight bias from coworkers.
On average, those who reported weight discrimination gained 0.95kg whereas those who did not lost 0.71kg, a difference of 1.66kg.