weeverfish

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weeverfish

(wē′vĕr-fĭsh″) [O.Fr. wivre, serpent + ″]
Any of several species of poisonous, bottom-dwelling fish of shallow salt waters, with dorsal and opercular spines that are used to inject a toxin into skin and soft tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
The weever fish has sharp spines laced with venom along its dorsal fin which stick up out of the sand, where it hides, and can inflict agony on anyone unlucky enough to tread on one.
(29) See John Weever, Ancient Funerall Monuments within the United Monarchie of Great Britaine, Ireland, and the Islands Adjacent with the Dissolved Monasteries Therein Contained (London, 1631), 6; John Foxe, Actes and Monuments (London, 1583), 108; John Speed, The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine (London, 1612), where the second table in the appendices lists Aurelius as buried at Stonehenge; and Raphael Holinshed, The First and Second Volumes of Chronicles, Comprising 1 The Description and Historie of England, 2 The Description and Historie of Ireland, 3 The Description and Historie of Scotland (London, 1587), 85, 88.
DANGEROUS: A weever fish, left, similar to the one which stung a man while he was fishing at Runswick Bay
(23) John Weever, Epigrammes in the oldest cut, and newest fashion (London, 1599), sig.
Blue Reef aquarist Anna Pellegrino said: "Until recently, weever fish reports tended to be confined to southern beaches, but we have noticed a definite rise in people getting stung.
BEACH walkers and swimmers have been warned to be extra careful after an upsurge in the number of people being attacked by the poisonous weever fish.
The final match, fished at Sandsend, was won by Peter Race, who caught six flounder, two mackerel and a weever for 212cm.
On the beaches, coastguard officers warned people yesterday to take care after a 13-year-old boy was taken to hospital after being stung by a weever fish in Milford Haven.
John Weever, for instance, in Faunus and Melliflora (1600), praises "the excellency,/Of the Rhamnusian Scourge of Villainy." (17) Weever's phrase captures the ambiguity of Marston's title, which signifies both the volume and its author.
In the course of demonstrating that The Whipping of the Satyre (1601) was the work of John Weever, Arnold Davenport notes that both The Whipping and Weever's earlier publication Faunus and Melliflora (1600) "have commendatory poems by 'I.
Individual chapters then treat Richard Verstegan; Sir Robert Cotton and his library; John Selden; James Ussher; Sir Henry Spelman and William Somner; John Weever; Sir William Dugdale; Thomas Browne, William Burton and Thomas Fuller; and John Aubrey.