weak

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weak

(wēk) [Old Norse veikr, flexible]
1. Lacking physical strength or vigor; infirm, esp. as compared with what would be the normal or usual for that individual.
2. Dilute, as in a weak solution, or weak tea.
3. Biologically or chemically active; said, e.g., of acids, bases, electrolytes, muscles, or toxins.
References in periodicals archive ?
Imagine the 90-pound weakling as almost any television news product other than the network evening newscast.
"That's the one for us," declared Irene Grainger as she pointed to the weakling, even though her husband George and son Terry shook their heads.
* He tattooed a huge Star of David on his abs, which makes us wonder whether or not the choice of Lipnicki as the neurotic, gawkish, weakling archetype in both Jerry Maguire and Stuart Little didn't have some anti-Semitic force behind it.
They contended that PPPP was not a weakling, and no one should try to test its patience, as every activist of PPPP would defend its chairman till death.
Alas, Hiccup is a weakling and Stoick entrusts him to blacksmith Gobber (Craig Ferguson), who puts the lad through training alongside Astrid (America Ferrera), Fishlegs (Christopher Mintz-Plasse), Snotlout (Jonah Hill) and twins Ruffnut (Kristen Wiig) and Tuffnut (TJ Miller).
Though highly unlikely, meaningful changes in its ownership weakling its public policy role could put downward pressure on its ratings, the service added.
He's only a little weakling.' I said, 'Yeah totally, but if you poke a dog with a stick enough it's going to bite'.
Noting that the country is an economic powerhouse but a nutritional weakling, quoting the report by the British-based Institute of Development Studies (IDS), an Indian television channel reported.
Ms Riley said: "What normally happens is that the parents will push out the weakling and will raise one chick, so we have taken one chick out of each nest.
To give a comparison between the two warring sides, I drew a picture of a 15-stone man being provoked by a seven-stone weakling.
Now he has shrunk to a pygmy in the wings, bullied and beaten up by all-comers like some seven-stone weakling in a prizefight.
He is the 98-pound weakling, the boy who runs from baseballs, the camper who can't catch his own dinner, the bicycle racer who comes in the last of the last, the victimized little brother of an older bigger brother, the "C" student who makes up stories for book reports instead of actually reading the book.