weak

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weak

(wēk) [Old Norse veikr, flexible]
1. Lacking physical strength or vigor; infirm, esp. as compared with what would be the normal or usual for that individual.
2. Dilute, as in a weak solution, or weak tea.
3. Biologically or chemically active; said, e.g., of acids, bases, electrolytes, muscles, or toxins.
References in periodicals archive ?
and other major governments/central banks to weaken their currencies, while not a near-term probability, can no longer be ruled out," wrote Fels to company investors.
"However, the fact that AMOC has remained weak and weakened further throughout the 20th century, with a noticeable decline since about 1950, is very likely due to human factors."
TRC believes Yangming's credit metrics are likely to weaken further over the next two to three quarters due to weak profitability and high capital expenditures.
Traders have cited a range of factors for recent weakness, including some concerns about the country's future leadership as elections loom and a possible desire of the central bank to let the pound weaken modestly to help exporters.
As long as the Bank of Japan fails to lift interest rates, households' capital outflow will accelerate and further weaken the yen.
For both Sen and Appiah, one senses a leaning over backwards to weaken the identification of Muslim with an enemy of the West and modernity, or African with the primitive.
Normal use and exposure to the elements can gradually weaken the strength of a tie-down.
Researchers aren't sure why a B-12 deficiency may weaken bones.
A POLL has found a majority of people believe the marriage of the Prince of Wales to Camilla Parker Bowles will weaken the monarchy.
Susan Jacoby, director of the Center for Inquiry-Metro New York, a group that promotes the separation of church and state, wrote on the Op-Ed page of The Times in January that "the trial undermined the merging accommodation between religion and science by intensifying the fundamentalists' conviction that acceptance of evolution would inevitably weaken any type of faith."
House of Representatives for approving the new six-year transportation authorization bill, which, if passed, could potentially "weaken clean air and environmental protections" by rolling back parts of the Clean Air Act, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and historic preservation laws.