weak


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weak

(wēk) [Old Norse veikr, flexible]
1. Lacking physical strength or vigor; infirm, esp. as compared with what would be the normal or usual for that individual.
2. Dilute, as in a weak solution, or weak tea.
3. Biologically or chemically active; said, e.g., of acids, bases, electrolytes, muscles, or toxins.
References in periodicals archive ?
The purpose of this paper is to define generalized weak structures which is weaker than weak structures [2].
weak can be used of either a temporary or permanent loss of strength or power.
One PV observable is the effect of the weak interaction on neutrons passing through matter, which is analogous to the optical rotation of polarized photons traveling through a "handed" medium [5].
They show that the weak force between electrons is less than a millionth the strength of the electromagnetic force, says Krishna S.
The minister of finance will act for political gain even if it results in weak financial supervision that, in turn, leads to a whole host of future problems.
Surprisingly, visible specks which one might guess to be the weakest points were usually harmless in relation to other weak points that are, more difficult to see.
24] Also Peter Eisenman has used the notion of weak architecture in his writings [25] Sola-Morales projects Vattimo's ideas on the reality of architecture somewhat differently from my interpretation.
Weak sales and a delayed launch of new equipment have pushed MRV stock down 79 percent since mid-April.
One kind of weak layer forms when the water molecules in the snow nearest the warm ground move upward through the snowpack, says Tremper.
The weak comparable store sales trends have resulted in continued promotional activity, which, together with efforts to improve service levels, have resulted in lower operating margins.