electron

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electron

 [e-lek´tron]
any of the negatively charged particles arranged in orbitals around the nucleus of an atom and determining all of the atom's physical and chemical properties except mass and radioactivity. Electrons flowing in a conductor constitute an electric current; when ejected from a radioactive substance, they are beta particles.ƒ

The number of electrons revolving around the nucleus of an atom is equal to its atomic number. An atom of oxygen, for instance, which has an atomic number of 8, has eight electrons in orbit around the nucleus in a manner similar to the planets revolving around the sun in our solar system.

Electrons greatly influence the behavior of an atom toward other atoms. The combination of various elements to form compounds is brought about by the losing or gaining of electrons; the process is sometimes called “sharing” of electrons. For example, the combination of the elements sodium and chlorine produce the compound sodium chloride (table salt). This is accomplished by the transfer of one electron from the outer electron shell of the sodium atom to the outer electron shell of the chlorine atom. This combining of elements by the loss or gain of electrons is called electrovalence.

e·lec·tron (β-),

(ē-lek'tron),
One of the negatively charged subatomic particles that orbit the positive nucleus, in one of several energy levels called shells; in mass they are estimated to be 1/1836.15 of a proton; when emitted from inside the nucleus of a radioactive substance, electrons are called β particles. A nucleus and its electrons constitute an atom.
See also: shell.
[electro- + -on]

e·lec·tron

(β-) (ĕ-lek'tron)
One of the negatively charged subatomic particles that are distributed about the positive nucleus and with it constitute the atom; in mass they are estimated to be 1/1836.15 of a proton; when emitted from inside the nucleus of a radioactive substance, electrons are called beta particles.
[electro- + -on]

Electron

One of the small particles that make up an atom. An electron has the same mass and amount of charge as a positron, but the electron has a negative charge.

e·lec·tron

(ĕ-lek'tron)
Negatively charged subatomic particles that orbit the positive nucleus, in one of several energy levels called shells. A nucleus and its electrons constitute an atom.
[electro- + -on]
References in periodicals archive ?
We have seen that these considerations reinforce the underlying physical building blocks of quantum mechanics: the superposition principle, Heisenberg's uncertainty principle and wave-particle duality which is the most important of these.
In its treatment of light as both enlightenment and illusion, Nostromo looks ahead of its time to the wave-particle duality of light.
Such fields distort the wave-particle duality of economic quanta, warp the flow of informational quanta (ideas, data), steer patterns of innovation, trap (to some extent) the flows of investment capital, mutually interact in complex ways (e.g.
These features are embodied in what is called the "Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle." This principle, along with wave-particle duality and superposition of states, is crucial to our discussion of quantum computation and communication.
This will not only deliver us from the perennial wave-particle duality, but will open up possibilities to understand the nature in a much broader way, without limiting ourselves to the pre-conceived notions.
Recent Contributions of Electron Interferometry to Wave-Particle Duality. In Selleri F., ed.
These basic and intriguing tenets of quantum mechanics provided me with a manageable research question: how could I make art that spoke about the wave-particle duality of light; and the idea of the observer being part of and influencing what is observed?
As a result, the classic paradoxes, 'renormalization,' wave-particle duality, and Copenhagen uncertainty, no longer exist.
"To explain the wave-particle duality, we need entanglement and correlation," he says.
Wave-particle duality is further exemplified in Wheeler's delayed-choice Gedanken Experiment (,978b).
Modelling Quantum Physics--working with porcelain, using its translucent nature to embody the ideas of the wave-particle duality of light.
Arbitrary mixed dislocations can be decomposed into a screw component and an edge component, giving rise to wave-particle duality [5].