waveform

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Related to wave form: Sinusoidal waveform

wave·form

(wāv'fōrm),
The form of a pressure or sound wave, electric stimulus, or pulse; for example, an arterial pressure or displacement wave; or of a sound or pacemaker pulse as demonstrated on an oscilloscope.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

wave·form

(wāv'fōrm)
The form of a pulse (e.g., an arterial pressure or displacement wave), or of the pacemaker pulse as demonstrated on the oscilloscope under a specified load.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

waveform

The shape or the representation of a signal, e.g., in cardiology, the shape of the electrical shock used in cardioversion or defibrillation.

biphasic waveform

A waveform used by some defibrillators that discharges energy in two phases (first positive, then negative). The shock applied by a biphasic defibrillator uses 30-40% less peak current at the same applied energy level than a monophasic defibrillator and is both less injurious to the heart and more likely to terminate ventricular fibrillation.

damped sinusoidal waveform

A defibrillation waveform that rises sharply to a peak voltage and then returns gradually to zero.

monophasic waveform

A waveform used by some defibrillators that delivers a single shock of positive energy to the myocardium.

truncated exponential waveform

A defibrillation waveform that rises sharply to a peak voltage and then is abruptly cut off and returns to zero.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Propagation of a wave form at light speed across a distance of [10.sup.-32] centimeters of one of these dimensions occurs in an interval of only 3.33x[10.sup.40] seconds.
Hertz, the discoverer of radio waves (see 1888), had found that cathode rays could pass through thin sheets of metal, and this seemed to favor their being a wave form. In 1892 one of Hertz's assistants, the German physicist Philipp Eduard Anton Lenard (1862-1947), devised a cathode ray tube with a thin aluminum "window" through which cathode rays could emerge into open air.
The solid state circuitry has been modified to provide better wave form control and excellent protection for sensitive electronics and electric motors.
I realised that I could place a straight line on an invisible wave and make the wave form control the movement of the straight line."