soluble fibre

(redirected from water-soluble fibre)

soluble fibre

One of two forms of dietary fibre—the other being insoluble fibre—which dissolves in water and slows gastric emptying, slows absorption of food, increases the stool bulk and reduces absorption of cholesterol, lowering LDL-cholesterol levels.  A 5–10-g/day increase of soluble fibre in the diet translates into ±5% decrease in serum cholesterol, plasma LDL-cholesterol and apolipoprotein B, and lesser reductions of HDL-cholesterol and apolipoprotein AI.  

Soluble fibre-rich foods
Oatmeal, oats, barley, lentils, apples, oranges, pears, oat bran, strawberries, nuts, flaxseeds, beans, dried peas, legumes, guar gums, blueberries, psyllium, cucumbers, celery, carrots.
References in periodicals archive ?
The consumption of dietary fibre, especially water-soluble fibre, is inversely associated with coronary heart disease risk and the National Academy of Sciences recommends a fibre intake of 38 g and 25 g/day for men and women, respectively, based on an intake of 14 g of fibre/1000 calories.
Eating sulphur-rich foods such as onions and garlic, water-soluble fibre (pears, oat bran and apples), and beetroot, artichokes and carrots can improve her liver function.