water-borne pathogen

water-borne pathogen

A pathogen, usually bacterial, that infects via contaminated water; WBPs cause gastroenteritis when ingested via the GI tract, or URIs, when the microorganisms are aerosolized, as in legionellosis; virulence of WBPs ranges widely. from enterotoxigenic E coli, Campylobacter jejuni, and nontyphoid Salmonella which are rarely fatal; others are highly virulent–eg, V cholerae–15% mortality, or Salmonella typhi or Shigella dysenteriae–5-10% mortality
References in periodicals archive ?
solanacearum is a soil and water-borne pathogen that can enter the host plant through wounds that occur on the root (Alvarez et al., 2008).
The findings are significant because, until now, researchers had not identified the early strains of cholera, a water-borne pathogen.
To prevent the spread of water-borne infections, affordable point-of-use water treatment strategies that can be effective against all kinds of water-borne pathogens are needed.
Darius was shooting a demo video for the filter - which removes 99.9 per cent of known water-borne pathogens, bacteria and viruses - next to a Thames sewage outlet.
He said that chlorine is the best protectant against almost all water-borne pathogens, is easily available, and it is easy to use.
Water-borne pathogens are degraded in the system's first section and passed through to the planted gravel filter, which performs even more degradation of organic matter and removes pathogens.
In terms of water-borne pathogens, UV radiation, in cost-effective doses, effectively inactivates common pathogens such as Cryptosporidium (parasites that cause the intestinal infection cryptosporidiosis), Giardia (protracted, intermittent diarrhea suggestive of malabsorption, which can cause dysentery), as well as most bacterial pathogens.
Ensuring that both products and equipment are kept free of water-borne pathogens isan ongoing challenge for dairy processors.
Moreover, there is increasing concern regarding the impact of water-borne pathogens on human health.
OTHER water-borne pathogens include typhoid, polio, hepatitis and diptheria.