water intoxication


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intoxication

 [in-tok″sĭ-ka´shun]
1. stimulation, excitement, or impaired judgment caused by a chemical substance, or as if by one.
2. substance intoxication, especially that due to ingestion of alcohol (see discussion at alcoholism). Alcohol intoxication is defined legally according to a person's blood alcohol level; the definition is 0.10 per cent or more in most states in the U.S. and 0.8 per cent or more in Canada.
alcohol idiosyncratic intoxication a term previously used for marked behavioral change, usually belligerence, produced by ingestion of small amounts of alcohol that would not cause intoxication in most persons. It is now felt that there is no evidence for a distinction between this condition and any other form of alcohol intoxication.
caffeine intoxication caffeinism (def. 2).
cannabis intoxication physiological and psychological symptoms following the smoking of marijuana or hashish, including euphoria, preoccupation with auditory and visual stimuli, and apathy. Intoxication occurs almost immediately after smoking and peaks within 30 minutes.
pathological intoxication alcohol idiosyncratic i.
substance intoxication a type of substance-induced disorder, consisting of reversible, substance-specific, maladaptive behavioral or psychological changes directly resulting from the physiologic effects on the central nervous system of recent ingestion of or exposure to a drug of abuse, medication, or toxin. Specific cases are named on the basis of etiology, e.g., alcohol intoxication.
water intoxication a condition resulting from undue retention of water with decrease in sodium concentration, marked by lethargy, nausea, vomiting, and mild mental aberrations; in severe cases there may be convulsions and coma.

wa·ter in·tox·i·ca·tion

a metabolic encephalopathy resulting from severe overhydration.

water intoxication

Hyperhydration due to excess ingestion of water, resulting in dilutional hyponatremia; WI is most common in Pts with psychiatric or neurologic disease, and may be accompanied by impaired renal fluid excretion and ↑ secretion of ADH, altered mental status, irritability, seizures, somnolence, hypothermia, edema; it is common in infants living in poverty, whose parents 'stretch' powdered formula by adding water Sports medicine Cerebral hyponatremia, hyponatremic encephalopathy A specific form of WI affecting the senses, which occurs in otherwise healthy long-distance runners–eg, ultramarathoners. See Marathon.

wa·ter in·tox·i·ca·tion

(waw'tĕr in-toks'i-kā'shŭn)
Nonphysiologic state caused by excessive water intake during exercise resulting in headache, nausea, and cramping. In severe cases, it may cause seizures and even death.

water intoxication

The effect of excessive water retention in the brain in the course of any disorder causing general OEDEMA. The condition features headache, dizziness, confusion, nausea and sometimes seizures and coma. Treatment is the correction of the cause and measures to withdraw water from the brain into the blood.

Water intoxication

A potentially life-threatening condition caused by drinking too much water, which leads to hyponatremia and may result in seizures, coma, and death.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hansen, "Hyponatraemic seizure in a 6-month-old infant due to water intoxication," Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, vol.
Kleigman: Hyponatremia Seizures Secondary to Oral Water Intoxication in Infancy: Association with Commercial Bottled Drinking Water.
Signs Of water intoxication include lethargy, bloating, vomiting, loss of coordination (stumbling, falling, staggering), restlessness, increased salivation, pale gums, dilated pupils, and glazed eyes.
Water intoxication, a dangerous situation, can occur in various clinical settings involving excessive water intake and impaired renal excretion of free water.
Acute water intoxication after intranasal desmopressin in a patient with primary polydispsia.
"This is also known as water intoxication or over-hydration, and can be extremely serious." - Reuters
* The infusion of 5% dextrose/0.18% saline solution led to "water intoxication."
The only exception is if you drink way too much, you may develop a rare but serious condition called water intoxication. In general, daily fluid recommendations are nine cups for women and thirteen cups for men (including all beverages).
"In fact, obstetric patients should drink something with electrolytes in it rather than just water to avoid water intoxication, which has been known to occur."
Water intoxication, especially in babies, can cause sodium in the blood to plummet, causing seizures, brain damage and, in severe cases, death.
Dartmouth College recently banned water pong, which Dartmouth Community Director Kristin Deal told Time "can be just as dangerous, if not more so," than beer pong, given the possibility of water intoxication.
Fluid administration combined with desmopressin therapy must be managed carefully to avoid the complication of dilutional hyponatremia or water intoxication (excess electrolyte-free water) (Bohn, Davids, Friedman, & Halperin, 2005; Taylor & Durward, 2004).