crustacean

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crustacean

(krŭ-stā′shən)
n.
Any of various predominantly aquatic arthropods of the subphylum (or class) Crustacea, including lobsters, crabs, shrimps, and barnacles, characteristically having a segmented body, a chitinous exoskeleton, paired jointed limbs, and two pairs of antennae.

crus·ta′cean adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

crustacean

a member of the class Crustacea in the phylum Arthropoda. The class includes shrimps, lobsters, crabs and water fleas. Most forms are aquatic, although a few are terrestrial, living in damp places, e.g. woodlice.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The spiny water flea was discovered in the Great Lakes in the mid-1980s, likely introduced as a result of a dumping freighter.
Some well-fed water fleas were more infectious than others because they were able to survive for longer with the parasite, giving it more time to multiply.
Vanderploeg used sets of paired traps to capture Great Lakes water with similar concentrations of water fleas and other zooplankters from several sites in Lake Huron.
Named for the insects they resemble, water fleas are crustaceans that usually filter feed.
"The spiny water flea, at the present time, wipes out most of the zooplankton in the lake to a depth of greater than five metres," he said.
A water flea is getting tangled in a hydra's stinging tentacles (left).
Spiny water flea spores have been identified in ballast-tank residue, and it's possible this is how this and other alien species have found their way into the lakes.
Washington, Feb 09 (ANI): Scientists have discovered that the near-microscopic freshwater crustacean Daphnia pulex, or water flea is the animal with the most genes, about 31,000.
His team has also studied copper's effect on a tiny water flea (Daphniapulav)--a crustacean about 2.5 millimeters long--that serves as the bottom rung on many lake-animal food ladders.
Last year, the spiny water flea (Bythotrephes longimanus), was found in Great Sacandaga Lake in the southern Adirondacks--the first confirmation of this invasive species in a New York water body other than the Great Lakes.
The team saw that water flea babies were born on schedule but were underdeveloped; some lacked appendages important for swimming, for instance.
In late 1998, for example, the fishhook water flea (Cercopagis pengoi) appeared for the first time in Lake Ontario.