waste


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waste

 [wāst]
1. gradual loss, decay, or diminution of bulk.
2. material that is unfit for further use within the organism.
3. to gradually deteriorate.

waste

(wāst)
v.
To gradually lose energy, strength, or bodily substance, as from disease.
n.
The undigested residue of food eliminated from the body; excrement.

waste

Environment adjective Relating to materials that are discarded or disposed of–eg, waste water noun Materials that are discarded or disposed–eg, biohazardous, hazardous, and regulated waste Medicine verb To become emaciated, to lose body mass, as occurs in terminal stages of progressive disease–eg, AIDS or cancer

waste

1. gradual loss, decay, or diminution of bulk.
2. useless and effete material, unfit for further use within the organism.
3. to pine away or dwindle.

waste disposal
techniques for disposing of a veterinary practice's, or abattoir or feedlot or milking shed wastes. By incineration, deep burial, washed away in a sewer as any other effluent or reclamation for industrial or agricultural use. Disposal of wastes from a veterinary practice or service has additional problems. There is a need for disposal of animal cadavers, kennel and pen wastes, tissue specimens, blood and milk and other samples. Much of the material is infected, some of it dangerous to humans, and therefore needs to be disposed of legally and systematically.
waste management system
planned, economic and conservationist program for the recycling and conservation of waste.
recycled waste
includes chicken litter, newsprint, sugar cane bagasse, fruit pomace, crude sewage, sewage sludge used as pasture topdressing and feed for farm animals, newsprint used as bedding for horses. See also recycled animal wastes.
References in periodicals archive ?
ratification of the Basel Convention, an international treaty drafted in 1989 that aims to prevent hazardous wastes from being dumped in the developing world (wastes exported for reuse and recycling are allowed under the treaty, however).
A state investigation showed 331 occasions in which the companies picked up waste but did not take it where they were supposed to.
Updating the original 1988 "Michigan Solid Waste Policy" to support these goals.
Steve Tucker, vice president, Waste Management of Los Angeles, a division of Waste Management Inc.
As a concept, zero waste has come a long way in a very short time.
Therefore, EPA may seek higher penalties as a result of improperly characterized waste used in a city park.
The company's later projects to develop waste facilities in Mexico battled the taint of San Luis Potosi.
HVS-R/E Hospitality Waste Management Systems also provides access to a wide variety of waste disposal and recycling equipment at discounted competitive pricing, and assists in regulatory reporting to helps to ensure legal compliance (thus avoiding fines and penalties) and minimize environmental impact.
Tribe members, she says, were scared they would lose their jobs or homes if they voted against the waste site.
Following this line of thinking, large nursing homes and nursing homes that share a campus with a hospital might use the time to compare the costs of commercial waste management versus purchase and operation of an EPA-approved incinerator.
Macedo began fusing nuclear waste into glass in 1985, when DOE sought VSL's help in processing high-level uranium and plutonium wastes at its West Valley, N.