wash

(redirected from washerwoman)
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wash

 [wosh]
a solution used for cleansing or bathing a part, as an eye or the mouth. See also irrigation and lavage.

wash

(wahsh),
A solution used to clean or bathe a part. For types of washes, see the specific term, for example, eyewash, mouthwash.
An acronym for Warfarin-Aspirin Study of Heart Failure

wash

(wawsh)
A solution used to clean or bathe a part.
References in periodicals archive ?
The newsboy son of a poor washerwoman, losing his papers and few prized trinkets, joins a gang of youngsters out to exploit the disarray.
There are interesting variants, however, such as Baldwin's interpretation of 'The Irish Washerwoman'.
"When I was asked to play the dame I refused but the first time an audience saw me on stage in a washerwoman's outfit they were rolling around laughing."
In Justice's case, (previously known as Ice) this has certainly been the case as he started off his life in the dream city as a well to do young man "with a car, a flat, a washerwoman, a billion friends and saw the underwear of almost all the girls who were going to Wits".
An occasional washerwoman, Fanny was one among anonymous thousands scraping an existence in London's foul slums, where the merely poor habitually preyed on the destitute.
In one of the greatest acts of transformation in the 20th century, Freda Josephine McDonald, a washerwoman's daughter from St.
At one point the young Romaine was virtually tossed away to live in poverty with the family's washerwoman. Sandwiched between most chapters are fragments of Barney's writings and others from a contemporary novel that appears to be Souhami's attempt at a novel that Barney might have written.
The farmer and the washerwoman excitedly interrupted each other.
The skin on the hands and feet of a body will have a wrinkled "washerwoman" appearance if immersed for more than 1 or 2 hours.
The third and least satisfying struggles to present Callie House, washerwoman turned activist turned convict.
Sharon tells Pauline of her planned round the world trip with Dennis, yet the whinging washerwoman manages to convince her that life in Walford would be better.
The analogy is emphasized by the remarkable "tasting menu" with which the exhibition began: a vitrine of twenty small sculptures spanning four decades of the artist's career, from a kneeling washerwoman dated 1896 to a seated nude of his model and muse, Dina Vierny, dated 1937.