warm-blooded animal


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ho·me·o·therm

(hō'mē-ō-therm),
Any animals, including mammals and birds, that tend to maintain a constant body temperature.
[homeo- + G. thermos, warm]

warm-blooded animal

An animal whose body temperature remains constant regardless of the temperature of the environment.
Synonym: endotherm
See also: animal

warm-blooded animal

see HOMOIOTHERM.
References in periodicals archive ?
The asexual phase can take place in all warm-blooded animals which are defined as intermediate hosts (Dubey and Jones, 2008; Hill and Dubey, 2002).
1 : a small, wingless, and usually flat insect that lives on the bodies of warm-blooded animals
According to the biological principle known as Bergman's Rule, "warm-blooded animals living in cold climates tend to be larger than animals of the same species living in warm climates".
It is also advisable to stay away from raw or undercooked meat and uncooked or unwashed vegetables that may have been contaminated by manure (although felines are the parasites' primary host, other warm-blooded animals and birds can also be carriers).
A parasite that consumes the living flesh of warm-blooded animals will be targeted in an emergency eradication program here, reports AP (April 3, 2007).
coli is found in the intestines of warm-blooded animals, it does not naturally contaminate most produce.
There, she cares for 33 dolphins and educates the park's guests about these aquatic mammals, or warm-blooded animals that live in the ocean.
It is the first time that changes in body temperature have been shown to affect lifespan in warm-blooded animals.
Garry Jones, 47, and Lynne Roberts, 40, of Conwy Road, Llandudno, were disqualified from keeping 'warm-blooded animals' after pleading guilty to a charge of causing unnecessary suffering.
Answer: All warm-blooded animals are susceptible to blue-green algae toxins, including people, waterfowl and household pets.
The airline's Pet First programme is available from Atlanta, Cincinnati, Dallas and Salt Lake City, and is designed to address the special needs of warm-blooded animals shipped as cargo without their owner.
Beginning with the first cases in 1999, the mosquito-borne West Nile virus has become established in North America, causing illness and claiming the lives of humans, birds, and other warm-blooded animals.