warm-blooded

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ho·me·o·ther·mic

(hō'mē-ō-ther'mik),
Pertaining to, or having the essential characteristic of, homeotherms. Compare: poikilothermic, heterothermic.

warm-blooded

also

warmblooded

(wôrm′blŭd′ĭd)
adj.
Zoology Maintaining a relatively constant and warm body temperature independent of environmental temperature; homeothermic.

warm′-blood′ed·ness, warm′blood′ed·ness n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Crash course: Colliding cold and warm air causes the warm air to rise in an updraft.
But temperatures during those seasons haven't warmed significantly, says Sturm.
Remove from, the heat, strain, and reserve the sausages keeping warm.
And then you look at how the earth's temperature has responded, and it has not warmed more than a tenth or two-tenths of a degree.
As a hurricane cruises over the ocean, it intensifies through the constant input of warm, moist air from the sea surface.
Accompany with warm kohlrabi salad and semmelschmarren.
Slice each lobe into six pieces and set aside keeping warm.
They may, in fact, have to warm up twice before the game: (1) warm up and sit down for about five minutes, and (2) then throw again.
According to Gregory Bossart, a marine-mammal veterinarian at Florida's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution, "As the plants close, the manatees may be at risk of dying from cold-water-related illnesses." That's because manatees only have a thin layer of blubber, or fatty tissue, to keep warm. The blubber works as insulation--trapping heat, like a down jacket.
They're warmer because of the Gulf Stream, which carries warm water northward and eastward to the North Atlantic.
It was during the Medieval Warm Period that the Vikings discovered Greenland and made their other remarkable voyages of exploration in the North Atlantic.
Males, in particular, need to keep warm so they can sing to win mates.