waggle dance

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waggle dance

the behaviour pattern by which bees convey information on the location of pollen supplies.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(https://www.sciencenews.org/article/honeybee-brain-upgrades-may-help-insects-find-food) This type of neural refinement works in such a way that forager bees are now equipped to better sense the type of air vibrations that their fellow bees produce while doing their waggle dances. Strange but amusing all the same, waggle dances are done by bees to tell other bees about a specific food location, along with its distance and quality.
According to computational neuroscientist Ajayrama Kumaraswamy of the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat Munchen in Germany , this type of neural refinement suggest that forager bees have neurons that become much more adept when it comes to decoding the vibrations produced during waggle dances.
There's an amazing amount of information packed into this non-fiction book for kids aged 5+, touching on waggle dances, how to create a bee-friendly garden, what makes a queen bee and why there are now fewer bees buzzing around the planet.
In the article titled "Waggle Dances and Azimuthal Windows" [1], an acknowledgment should be added as follows.
Another significant observation was that in contrast to the waggle dances, which occurred during the day when bees are foraging, the whoop signal occurred most frequently at night.
The results feed into an ongoing debate in the scientific community over whether the variation in waggle dances happens because bees are communicating a general area, not a specific flower, or simply because they are trying their best in difficult circumstances.
In reality, most waggle dances occur on a small area, 4-18 cm from the entrance to the hive, the "dance floor", and onlookers are able to obtain information about different nectar sources.
It is another to say that the waggle dances of bees in any way constitute deliberative rhetoric because the colony takes an action based on such communication.
We decoded waggle dances to determine foraging distances from the waggle run, which is the information-rich portion of the dance [17, 23].
They then video-recorded the scouts producing waggle dances and tracked dances produced by the marked scouts with a microphone and videotape to ascertain when they received stop signals, and from which bees.
In the new study, Seeley, a professor of neurobiology and behaviour, reports with five colleagues in the United States and the United Kingdom that scout bees also use inhibitory 'stop signals' - a short buzz delivered with a head butt to the dancer - to inhibit the waggle dances produced by scouts advertising competing sites.
One way honeybees do this is through their waggle dance. Biologists have now shed some new light on the benefits and disadvantages of the bee dance.