waddling gait

(redirected from waddle)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

gait

 [gāt]
the manner or style of walking.
gait analysis evaluation of the manner or style of walking, usually done by observing the individual walking naturally in a straight line. The normal forward step consists of two phases: the stance phase, during which one leg and foot are bearing most or all of the body weight, and the swing phase, during which the foot is not touching the walking surface and the body weight is borne by the other leg and foot. In a complete two-step cycle both feet are in contact with the floor at the same time for about 25 per cent of the time. This part of the cycle is called the double-support phase.

An analysis of each component of the three phases of ambulation is an essential part of the diagnosis of various neurologic disorders and the assessment of patient progress during rehabilitation and recovery from the effects of a neurologic disease, a musculoskeletal injury or disease process, or amputation of a lower limb.
antalgic gait a limp adopted so as to avoid pain on weight-bearing structures, characterized by a very short stance phase.
ataxic gait an unsteady, uncoordinated walk, with a wide base and the feet thrown out, coming down first on the heel and then on the toes with a double tap.
double-step gait a gait in which there is a noticeable difference in the length or timing of alternate steps.
drag-to gait a gait in which the feet are dragged (rather than lifted) toward the crutches.
equine gait a walk accomplished mainly by flexing the hip joint; seen in crossed leg palsy.
festinating gait one in which the patient involuntarily moves with short, accelerating steps, often on tiptoe, with the trunk flexed forward and the legs flexed stiffly at the hips and knees. It is seen in parkinson's disease and other neurologic conditions that affect the basal ganglia. Called also festination.
four-point gait a gait in forward motion using crutches: first one crutch is advanced, then the opposite leg, then the second crutch, then the second leg, and so on.
Four-point gait. From Elkin et al., 2000.
gluteal gait the gait characteristic of paralysis of the gluteus medius muscle, marked by a listing of the trunk toward the affected side at each step.
helicopod gait a gait in which the feet describe half circles, as in some conversion disorders.
hemiplegic gait a gait involving flexion of the hip because of footdrop and circumduction of the leg.
intermittent double-step gait a hemiplegic gait in which there is a pause after the short step of the normal foot, or in some cases after the step of the affected foot.
Oppenheim's gait a gait marked by irregular oscillation of the head, limbs, and body; seen in some cases of multiple sclerosis.
scissors gait a crossing of the legs while advancing with slow, small steps.
spastic gait a walk in which the legs are held together and move in a stiff manner, the toes seeming to drag and catch.
steppage gait the gait in footdrop in which the advancing leg is lifted high in order that the toes may clear the ground. It is due to paralysis of the anterior tibial and fibular muscles, and is seen in lesions of the lower motor neuron, such as multiple neuritis, lesions of the anterior motor horn cells, and lesions of the cauda equina.
stuttering gait a walking disorder characterized by hesitancy that resembles stuttering; seen in some hysterical or schizophrenic patients as well as in patients with neurologic damage.
swing-through gait that in which the crutches are advanced and then the legs are swung past them.
swing-to gait that in which the crutches are advanced and the legs are swung to the same point.
tabetic gait an ataxic gait in which the feet slap the ground; in daylight the patient can avoid some unsteadiness by watching his feet.
three-point gait that in which both crutches and the affected leg are advanced together and then the normal leg is moved forward. See illustration at crutches.
two-point gait that in which the right foot and left crutch or cane are advanced together, and then the left foot and right crutch. See illustration at crutches.
waddling gait exaggerated alternation of lateral trunk movements with an exaggerated elevation of the hip, suggesting the gait of a duck; characteristic of muscular dystrophy.

wad·dling gait

rolling gait in which the weight-bearing hip is not stabilized; it bulges outward with each step, while the opposite side of the pelvis drops, resulting in alternating lateral trunk movements; due to gluteus medius muscle weakness, and seen with muscular dystrophies, among other disorders.
Synonym(s): waddle

waddling gait

A gait disorder characterised by wide-based steps, swaying or rolling from side to side, toe-walking, symmetricalness, and due to myopathy and other neuromuscular disorders.

Clinical findings
Proximal muscle weakness of lower extremities; accentuation of lumbar lordosis.

waddling gait

Myopathic gait Neurology A gait in which the subject sways from side to side, due to a lack of hip stabilization; with ambulation, side A rolls up while side B rolls down in the opposite direction, accompanied by lateral trunk contortions; WG is typical of muscular dystrophy. See Gait.

wad·dling gait

(wahdling gāt)
Rolling gait in which the weight-bearing hip is not stabilized; it bulges outward with each step, while the opposite side of the pelvis drops, resulting in alternating lateral trunk movements; due to gluteus medius muscle weakness, seen in muscular dystrophies and other disorders.

wad·dling gait

(wahdling gāt)
Rolling ambulation in which weight-bearing hip is not stabilized; it bulges outward with each step, opposite side of pelvis drops, resulting in alternating lateral trunk movements; due to gluteus medius muscle weakness, and seen with muscular dystrophies, among other disorders.
References in periodicals archive ?
And while Waddle (right) fears for the Toon, he maintains the sky's the limit for the north London side.
Waddle got as far as a conversation with Freddy Shepherd and Douglas Hall as the duo tried to set up a Geordie dream team.
Fameye prior to Waddle's post on Facebook also made it known in a video posted on his Instagram page that he had a meeting with the AMG record boss and further praised him, Zionfelix.net can add.
Newcastle are seven points clear of Cardiff City who sit in 18th and Waddle says that the Magpies only need two points at the most to stay up.
And Waddle - who played for four years for Spurs and was on the losing side in the 1987 FA Cup Final - reckons that, in Mousa Dembele, they have a player reminiscent of Paul Gascoigne (inset, right).
Now in its seventh year, the Toddle Waddle is a free, nationwide event where youngsters saunter for a charitable cause.
Meningitis Now is asking local nurseries to enter into the waddling adventure, called Toddle Waddle.
Toddle waddle, an annual sponsored walk aimed at the under fives, is a chance for families to help raise awareness and money for those suffering from the impact of meningitis.
Waddle was at the 2009 European Under-21 Championships when the core of Germany's present senior squad first emerged.
Waddle, who made 62 appearances for England between 1985 and 1991, pinpointed the psychological advantage other teams have on penalties for England's lack of success.
Toddle Waddle was created to engage this age group and their parents, grandparents, nursery teachers and child minders - spreading awareness of the disease and its signs and symptoms, while at the same time raising funds to support the work of the Trust.
Chris Waddle was named the Ayers Chair of Communication at Jacksonville State University (JSU) in Alabama in the fall semester of 2008.