wadding

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wad·ding

(wahd'ing),
1. Carded cotton or wool in sheets, used for surgical dressing.
2. Fibrous material used in packing a firearm shell, often found in gunshot wounds inflicted at close range.
A disc of material—formerly fibre and paper, now plastic and cardboard—used in guns—most commonly in shotguns—to seal gas behind a projectile or to separate powder from shot

wad·ding

(wahd'ing)
Carded cotton or wool in sheets, used for surgical dressing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also in 1950, Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick, NJ, introduced a rectangular underpad product based on cellulose wadding and with a plastic film backing and using a wet strength tissue as a coverstock.
From this initial overview of the development of the modern all-in-one disposable diaper we can see that the product has evolved from a simple creped cellulose wadding structure that, despite its limitations, worked, to a complex multicomponent structure as illustrated in Figure 4.
The earliest products, based on cellulose wadding, had an absorption capacity determined by the quantity and characteristics of the cellulose wadding used.
The "improved" version used a cotton mesh coverstock that prevented the wet cellulose wadding from adhering [TABULAR DATA FOR TABLE 1 OMITTED] to the baby's skin and provided a degree of separation of the core material from the baby.
Also, without any form of leg seal in the early products, leakage was a potential problem, as the fluid - initially absorbed into the cellulose wadding - was easily forced out again by changes in the baby's position.
If a firm is to produce thermal insulation waddings in an inland region, its products can be manufactured and distributed onsite, reducing transportation costs considerably.
This will provide a big market for those consumer oriented nonwovens including various warmth retention materials (spray bonded waddings, silk floss-like waddings, thermal bonded waddings), disposable sanitary products (napkins, diapers, medical articles, operating gowns), various interlinings and home textiles (carpets, wall coverings, curtains).