vulvar vestibulitis syndrome


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vulvar vestibulitis syndrome

The presence of severe pain on pressing or touching the vestibule of the vagina or on attempted vaginal entry. Physical findings of localized erythema are limited to the mucosa of the vestibule. Although the etiology is unknown, the syndrome often develops in women who have intractable moniliasis or who are receiving long-term antibiotic therapy. No therapy, including vestibulectomy, has been 100% effective. See: vulvodynia
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

Vulvar vestibulitis syndrome; VVS

Vulval vestibulitis; vulvar dysesthesia; inflammation of the vestibule.
Mentioned in: Vulvodynia
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Willen, "Vestibular nerve fiber proliferation in vulvar vestibulitis syndrome," Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol.
Torebjork, "Psychophysical evidence of nociceptor sensitization in vulvar vestibulitis syndrome," Pain, vol.
All of the women enrolled in the study had a prior diagnosis of vulvar vestibulitis syndrome. As part of the investigation, the women underwent a gynecologic examination and completed a structured interview and standarized questionnaires focusing on pain self-efficacy, pain catastrophization, anxiety, and pain during intercourse.
candidate in psychology at the university, presented additional data from the same investigation linking dyadic adjustment to psychological distress and sexual impairment in women with vulvar vestibulitis syndrome.
Khalife "A new instrument for pain assessment in vulvar vestibulitis syndrome," Journal of Sex Marital Therapy 30 (2004):69-78.
Khalife, et al., "Vulvar vestibulitis syndrome: A critical review," Clinical Journal of Pain 13 (1997):27-42; CF Pukall, M-A Lahaie, and YM Binik.
And he's more convinced than ever that Candida albicans is a key player in idiopathic vulvar vestibulitis syndrome. At least half of the patients he culures prove positive for C.
SAN FRANCISCO -- Eradication of human papilloma virus by interferon therapy does not result in a clinical response in the majority of patients with persistent vulvar vestibulitis syndrome, Dr.
He and associates prospectively evaluated 24 patients who had symptoms of vulvar vestibulitis syndrome for at least 6 months and a positive HPV detected by PCR.