vulnerable person


Also found in: Legal.

vulnerable person

A UK term for an individual who is at risk of abuse or harm due to life circumstances—e.g., underage, homeless, mentally ill or retarded, frail and elderly.
References in periodicals archive ?
It gives the vulnerable person a short-term cash boost but leaves them to pay the interest free loan off, usually via a deduction to their benefits.
However, I strongly recommend that every severely disabled or vulnerable person carry a special card in Wales.
At the opening of the Paris trial, Ribery's lawyer Carlo-Alberto Bruso said: "There was nothing about her that suggested a vulnerable person. She is a woman always made-up, with her hair done and well dressed."
"Without it, social services can do what they think is in the best interests of a vulnerable person, if they think they lack mental capacity to make a choice."
"This was an unpleasant attack on a vulnerable person," Judge John Warner told Aaron Hill.
Karl Williams, Cheshire police's external funding coordinator, said: "The situation a vulnerable person is in often means picking up the phone and calling the police is not as easy as it sounds.
Millie's mother Rachel Martin, 27, faces a charge of "allowing the death of a child or vulnerable person" and child cruelty.
The watchdog is now managing an investigation in to the actions of West Midlands Police over the the care given to a vulnerable person whilst in custody in April.
A Gwent Police spokeswoman said: "This incident was a particularly nasty attack on a vulnerable person.
From tomorrow there will be added stress for pensioners, the disabled and every other vulnerable person who has the misfortune to drive to the Walsgrave site.
It also happens and goes unnoticed in many families where an older person will target a younger more vulnerable person by humiliating them, making their lives totally unbearable.
Dc Gareth Jones said: 'This was a despicable crime against a vulnerable person in a public place in the middle of the day.