vulgarism

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vulgarism

A word or phrase not in good usage, coarse, unrefined
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
I am appalled by the vulgarisms in my early books" - Writer Martin Amis.
I am appalled by the vulgarisms in my early books" Writer Martin Amis "It is part of the job of a woman to be impeccable.
(22) Jones echoes Joseph Jacobs, who, in commenting about the rewriting he did to make the tales in English Fairy Talesmore suitable for their audience, adds that he "left a few vulgarisms in the mouths of vulgar people.
According to the Guardian, the Ulema Council complained to Karzai that there were 'many TV stations that turn to vulgarisms and broadcast immoral programmes, which are counter to national interests and Islamic values'.
He is much more intellectual than either, uses a more elevated language, not disfigured by vulgarisms, and is not liable to the low passion for plunder as they are....
It banned the mildest of vulgarisms. The Code was the reason Hollywood movies looked coy and contrived next to European films of the postwar period.
Dark Logic has its gems, but to reach them, readers will have to wade through a morass of jargon (e.g., "tactical syndromes"), banal metaphors (e.g., "cat-and-mouse"), tautologies (e.g., "previously unprecedented"), dehumanizing and tendentious labels (e.g., "illegal aliens" in lieu of the more neutral term "undocumented immigrants"), and bureaucratic vulgarisms borrowed straight from George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four (e.g., "enemies of the state").
But his Yankeeisms and vulgarisms exasperated even those reviewers, like Henry Irving Brock, who admired Lawrence's critical "acumen." In the New York Times Book Review, Brock complains that Lawrence's sentences "might often be composed by a gum-chewing Main Street soda-fountain cut-up or a blear-eyed bar-room bum" (9).
/ I'm one of the New Police" (6) Later, literary and dramatic figures such as Dickens' Inspector Bucket or Tom Taylor's Hankshaw were characterized by vulgarisms of speech, manner, and domestic conduct that excluded them from the middle-class affective economies central to the novel and genteel melodrama.
Many commentators on this have noted the Newbolt Report at the turn of the century and its emphasis on getting rid of the evil speech habits and vulgarisms of the street, and in the 1920s, George Sampson laid upon English teachers the responsibility 'to purify and disinfect' children's language.
In Mansfield Park, Fanny Price's sister Susan, anxious that "all her best manners" will be found inadequate to the ways of Mansfield, obsesses about the table: "Visions of good and ill breeding, of old vulgarisms and new gentilities were before her; and she was meditating much upon silver forks, napkins, and finger glasses" (446).
Richard Godden decodes a number of vulgarisms present or sub-rosa throughout Faulkner's fictions.