voracious

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Related to voracity: evitable, curmudgeonly, inexplicably, splayed

voracious

Etymology: L, vorax
greedy or gluttonous, with an insatiable appetite.

voracious

(vō-rā′shŭs) [L. vorare, to devour]
Having an insatiable or ravenous appetite.

voracious

said of appetite. See polyphagia.
References in periodicals archive ?
For these socially excluded young men, sexual risk therefore arose from a perceived failure in expertise and performance, from a lack of sexual voracity and from wrong partner choice; rather than from failure to use contraception or condoms.
Second, with the aggressiveness and rapid ascendency of China, and its growing voracity for territorial claims along the South China Sea, countries in the region, as raised and emphasized by Japan, are alarmed that China may adapt the same notion and posture as Russia.
The CSL also questions the dual hub strategy anticipated in the agreement and the legal voracity of starting a joint-venture airline between the two entities.
Also the phase of the moon seems to heavily influence their voracity asa predator.
And that it's almost immoral to call them into question or to question their voracity.
We have been expecting this US export increase for a long time, that's been central to our strategy, but even we are completely blown away by the sheer voracity of this," Bugbee says.
The scholarly erudition of this book is unimpeachable, and Allis's literary voracity is expressed through long, indented quotations whose frequency is almost excessive.
I applaud Chip's advocacy for what he very passionately believes to be right for credit unions, admire his knowledge and voracity, but this movement's goals are not appropriate for a regulatory agency.
In Spanish, the inscription reads: "To the victims of the Maine who were sacrificed by the voracity of the imperialists and their desire to gain control of the island of Cuba.
In the process, we learn that black holes may only spin so fast and this puts limits on their voracity and increases the energy output.
Frances Trollope is read here as exploring the limits placed on 'taste' by the voracity of sheer 'appetite' whereas Margaret Oliphant is seen to be idealising the male professional for doing the right thing but still expecting to be paid.
Instructors, meanwhile, harbor very different (and equally idealized) visions of what college should be like: an environment of openness and voracity for learning (pretty much the opposite of what's happening for fearful students).