seasickness

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seasickness

 [se´sik-nes]
discomfort caused by the motion of a boat under way, a form of motion sickness. The unusual motion disturbs the organs of balance located in the inner ear. Symptoms are nausea and vomiting, dizziness, headache, pallor, and cold perspiration. Ways to help ward off seasickness include staying in the fresh air instead of in a stuffy room, eating lightly, and avoiding fatty, fried, or spicy foods. Antinausea medicines may be effective. If seasickness occurs, the sufferer should rest lying down with the head low, in a comfortable well ventilated place. Also written sea sickness.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sea·sick·ness

(sē'sik-nĕs),
A form of motion sickness caused by the motion of a floating platform, such as a ship, boat, or raft.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

seasickness

(sē′sĭk′nĭs)
n.
Motion sickness resulting from the pitching and rolling of a ship or boat in water, especially at sea.

sea′sick′ adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

seasickness

A permutation of motion sickness, which occurs when a  susceptible individual is subjected to the pitching and rolling of a ship, especially at the extreme fore or aft of the vessel.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

seasickness

Neurology A type of motion sickness–type C, which occurs in susceptible persons subjected to the rock & roll of a ship at sea. See Motion sickness.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sea·sick·ness

(sē'sik-nĕs)
A form of motion sickness caused by the movement of a floating platform, such as a ship, boat, or raft.
Synonym(s): mal de mer.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012