voluntary erasure

voluntary erasure

A General Medical Council (GMC) (UK) term for a nondisciplinary removal of a medical practitioner’s name from the register of active doctors. Voluntary erasure does not imply misconduct by the practitioner, but means that he or she cannot practise as a doctor in the UK.
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At a hearing by the Medical Practitioners Tribunal Service, McCreadie applied for "voluntary erasure" from the General Medical Council register after being found guilty of misconduct on July 16.
A judge granted consultant paediatrician Dr Sabah Al-Zayyat a new opportunity to apply for "voluntary erasure" from the medical register on health grounds.
Mkhize said it was compulsory for practitioners to inform the Council when they stopped practising locally and emphasised that exercising their right of voluntary erasure precluded the need for any restoration penalties.
"He reiterated that he had no intention of practising medicine again whatever the outcome of the recent police investigation and has reiterated again his de-skilling and emphasised his application for voluntary erasure."
Dr Craig Morton, 27, had asked for "voluntary erasure", saying he no longer wanted to be a member of the General Medical Council."
Dr Craig Morton, 27, had asked for "voluntary erasure" - saying he no longer wanted to be a member of the General Medical Council, but he was not allowed to do this.
Dr Srivastava had been due to face a GMC fitness-to-practise hearing this week, but having retired in 1998 and now aged 73, she has agreed to a "voluntary erasure" of her name from the medical register.
More details are yet to emerge about the allegations, but on Monday Dr Malik, applied to be taken off the GMC register, a procedure known as voluntary erasure.
'The committee are satisfied that he understands that after voluntary erasure he will no longer be allowed to practise medicine.'
Dr Gustaf Aniansson has applied for "voluntary erasure", which would prevent him practising in the UK, but not stop him working abroad.
Dr Elwood, from Farnham, Surrey, escaped professional censure by opting for voluntary erasure from the medical register.
Craig Morton, 27, asked for "voluntary erasure", saying he no longer wanted to be a member of the General Medical Council.

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