volubility

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volubility

(vŏl″ū-bĭl′ĭ-tē) [L. volubilitas, flow of discourse]
Excessive speech.
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References in classic literature ?
right-right- right-all-right!" Here the Professor waved the memorandum of terms over his head, and ended his long and voluble narrative with his shrill Italian parody on an English cheer.
Sambo was a full black, of great size, very lively, voluble, and full of trick and grimace.
What was said in this disappointing anti-climax, by the disciples of the Good Republican Brutus of Antiquity, except that it was something very voluble and loud, would have been as so much Hebrew or Chaldean to Miss Pross and her protector, though they had been all ears.
It is no wonder that they overcame the French so easily on the water, when even the lowest sailor so well understood the different parts of a vessel.” But Billy Kirby was a fearless wight, and had great jealousy of foreign dictation; he had risen on his feet, and turned his back to the fire, during the voluble delivery of this interrogatory; and when the steward ended, contrary to all expectation, he gave the following spirited reply:
The low, voluble delivery was enough by itself to compel my attention.
Edre Olalia of the National Union of Peoples' Lawyers said the charges proved that '(the government was) lining and rounding up the most voluble and visible people who...
Our View: Why did our voluble politicians fail to challenge a bigoted bishop?
Chidi Odinkalu described the Ojukwu as a voluble humanist, whose ambition was to speak for the disadvantaged and underprivileged people of Nigeria.
Cable TV's most visible, voluble pundits on the news of the day.
The Turkish president, who is voluble even in his country's calmest moments, has been outspoken as the lira has tumbled, repeatedly attributing the depreciation to sabotage by outside powers and insisting that the fundamentals of the Turkish economy are sound.
This belief has influenced many Catholics and has undoubtedly been the source of the most voluble opposition to assisted death (along with similar views expressed by religious fundamentalists).