volubility


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Related to volubility: pellucidity

volubility

(vŏl″ū-bĭl′ĭ-tē) [L. volubilitas, flow of discourse]
Excessive speech.
References in periodicals archive ?
Richard Woodhouse has for instance remarked that his friend could "conceive of a billiard Ball that it may have a sense of delight from its own roundness, smoothness <& very> volubility. & the rapidity of its motion" (KC, 1:59).
Right now, Amaechi's volubility is frittering away his sympathizers, especially when he gets to hammer the PDP which he had been in cahoots with for about fourteen years now.
The second is the increased volubility, and now feasibility, of their threats against the American homeland.
Caballero's speech acts of silences are rendered more audible when contrasted with the volubility displayed elsewhere in the narrative.
Indeed, you'll liven this place up with your kinetic enthusiasm and volubility. With an MFA in creative writing from Arcadia University, where she graduated with honors, Tedesco's work has appeared in Boston Poetry Magazine, Rust + Moth, Broadkill Review, Quail Bell Magazine, and many other publications.
Distressed by the inconstancy and volubility of many of my thoughts, wills, and efforts, overwhelmed by the deep insecurity that the threatening mysteries of life produce in my spirit, I shed all my anguish into the world and I try to detect in nature signs of the irrevocable permanence which is absent in my mind.
Their topics include the impact of parent communication patterns on infant volubility during play with books, on the weight of phones in computing phonological word proximity, bilingual speech assessment for Maltese children, language impairment in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: a case study from Cyprus, and local assimilation in children acquiring Farsi: a study of typical versus atypical phonological development.
(2) By analyzing 25 tutorials with NS students and 19 tutorials with NNS students, coupled with retrospective interviews with both students and tutors, Thonus (2004) finds that when working with NNS students, NS tutors exhibited less laughter and greater volubility. Additionally, when serving NNS students, NS tutors were less consistent in their interactional behaviors; while they offered more explicit directives, they also tried not to provide authoritative advice (e.g., "I think that your instructor could answer a lot of these questions"), indicating that they were unsure of their roles with NNS students.
Those who favour "preserving the taste of Penang hawker food" need to keep this characteristic of volubility in mind, as hawker food evolves with changing tastes and environmental and economic considerations.
Only one of the novel's fifteen narrators satisfies both of the criteria (present-ness and volubility) of which Addie falls shy: Darl, Addie's second son.
Implicitly, it is the confusing "noise" of speech that Thomas Sprat denounces in his History of the Royal Society: "this vicious abundance of Phrase, this trick of Metaphors, this volubility of Tongue, which makes so great a noise in the World" (History of the Royal Society, 112).
As Terese Thonus has noted, when working with non-native speakers of English, tutors exhibited "fewer overlaps, less laughter and greater volubility, creating an uneven distribution of talk" resulting in a "tutorial [that] exhibits the transactional nature of a service encounter rather than a conversation" (237).