volition

(redirected from volitionally)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

volition

 [vo-lish´un]
the act or power of willing. adj., adj voli´tional.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

vo·li·tion

(vō-li'shŭn),
The conscious impulse to perform any act or to abstain from its performance; voluntary action.
[L. volo,, to wish]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

vo·li·tion

(vŏ-lish'ŭn)
The conscious impulse to perform any act or to abstain from its performance; voluntary action.
[L. volo,, to wish]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about volition

Q. What resources are available in Seattle, Washington to help with an autistic child?

A. i miss Seattle... here is a link to "Autism Spectrum Treatment and Research (ASTAR) Center". a well know establishment:

http://www.astarcenter.org/

More discussions about volition
This content is provided by iMedix and is subject to iMedix Terms. The Questions and Answers are not endorsed or recommended and are made available by patients, not doctors.
References in periodicals archive ?
(85) In short, Soeharto and Indonesia opted volitionally to exercise strategic moderation or restraint of the sort which Khong likely had in mind for the ARF.
Forgiveness is neither obligatory nor automatic; it is a conscious choice the injured person selects volitionally (Enright, 2001).
Arguably, the disproportionate impact of the CF rate on the perceived fairness of the fee arrangement stems from the fact that unlike the other factors--claimed sum, chance of success, and working hours--it is volitionally determined by the lawyer.
Theoretically, spindle acuity can be volitionally modulated through task-dependent muscle contraction (2).
For example, if an individual understood and identified with the benefits of exercise for their own health, they would exercise volitionally in an attempt to achieve personally valued outcomes.
1098/1687) who are best known for perpetuating his school of thought, not least his doctrines on the nature of existence and the thorny problem of the relationship between being and time, or rather how to reconcile the Neoplatonizing Aristotelian account of the cosmos that is an instrumental, even logical product of a Principle, an unmoved Mover, with the Islamic and Queanic account of a personal god who creates volitionally. A prolific, if somewhat obscure, philosopher, prone to an opaque and rather baroque style of writing, he was best known for his metaphysical doctrines relating to time and creation, returning to the topic repeatedly in his works.
The test was terminated when the subject volitionally stopped owing to fatigue, or the investigator determined that the subject could not maintain the designated pedal rate for 10 consecutive seconds.
Moser argues that the evidence a perfectly loving being worthy of worship would make available would be offered on God's own morally sensitive and volitionally challenging terms.
Test results for each subject were expressed as a predicted [VO.sub.2max] obtained by cross-referencing the final level and shuttle number (completed) at which the subject volitionally exhausted with that of the [VO.sub.2max] table provided in the instruction booklet accompanying the multi-stage 20-m shuttle run test.
How should guidelines for PSU address patients whose survival is shortened volitionally? If voluntary dehydration satisfies the end-of-life criteria of PSU guidelines, some may argue that PSU would be less ethically troubling, since initiating PSU does not introduce any new lethal dehydrating processes.
Dorsher and McIntosh reported an individual with SCI becoming "completely continent of urine and able to void volitionally after treatment with electroacupuncture."