volatile

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Related to volatile sulfur compounds: halitosis

volatile

 [vol´ah-til]
evaporating rapidly; vaporizing readily at low temperatures.

vol·a·tile (vol.),

(vol'ă-til),
1. Tending to evaporate rapidly.
2. Tending toward violence, explosiveness, or rapid change.
[L. volatilis, fr. volo, to fly]

volatile

(vŏl′ə-tl, -tīl′)
adj.
Chemistry
a. Evaporating readily at normal temperatures and pressures.
b. Capable of being readily vaporized.

vol′a·tile n.
vol′a·til′i·ty (-tĭl′ĭ-tē), vol′a·tile·ness (-tl-nĭs, -tīl′-) n.

vol·a·tile

(vol'ă-til)
1. Tending to evaporate rapidly.
2. Tending toward violence, explosiveness, or rapid change.
[L. volatilis, fr. volo, to fly]

Volatile

Something that vaporizes or evaporates quickly when exposed to air.
Mentioned in: Aromatherapy

vol·a·tile

(vol'ă-til)
1. Tending to evaporate rapidly.
2. Tending toward violence, explosiveness, or rapid change.
[L. volatilis, fr. volo, to fly]
References in periodicals archive ?
* Concentrations of undesirable volatile sulfur compounds in wine experience peaks and valleys over time in bottle.
Volatile sulfur Odor Threshold Literature AWRI compound descriptor ([micro] review g/L) Hydrogen [H.sub.2]S rotten egg, 1 nd-370 nd-56 sulfide sewage-like Methanethiol MeSH rotten 1.5 nd-16 nd-11 cabbage, burnt rubber, putrefication Dimethlyl DMS Black currant 25 nd-474 nd-980 sulfide (at low levels), cooked cabbage, asparagus, canned corn, molasses Table 1: Three important volatile sulfur compounds in wine and their aroma threshold levels.
Correlation between volatile sulfur compounds and certain oral health measurements in the general population.
Comparison of volatile sulfur compounds concentrations measured with a sulfide detector vs gas chromatography.
Comparative effects of different chlorhexidine formulations on volatile sulfur compounds and salivary bacterial counts.
Mechanical effects and volatile sulfur compound reducing effects of chewing gums.
The concentrations of volatile sulfur compounds in the wines were analysed over a 12-month period.
Significant changes in volatile sulfur compounds were observed during the 12-month period, with the Chardonnay samples showing increases in [H.sub.2]S and DMS, and the Shiraz samples showing increases in [H.sub.2]S and MeSH.
The most remarkable results of this study were the effects observed due to metals that have not previously been considered in the context of volatile sulfur compounds in wine (Mn, Zn and Al) and the interactions between the five metals.