vocational guidance


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vocational guidance

Helping people find jobs or careers that match their skills, needs, and interests.
See also: guidance
References in periodicals archive ?
Vocational guidance as currently delivered in British schools often places much emphasis on routes to full-time further and higher education, rather less on employment combined with training possibilities.
A form of guidance is vocational guidance which is a system of principles, methods and processes to guide a person to a profession or group of professions according, on the one hand, to their skills, inclinations and interests and, on the other hand, depending on labor market prospects.
She added that the Ministry, through cooperation with International Labor Organization (ILO) seeks to provide different models to achieve better vocational guidance policies.
This progressive social reform movement also supported vocational guidance and was a critical factor in the establishment of career counseling (Pope, 2000).
He added that al-Baath University and the UNRWA work together in holding training courses for youth to develop their skills required for job market in Syria in cooperation with Training and Qualifications Directorate and Vocational Guidance Center in the university.
Specialists in areas of education and vocational guidance will speak at workshops that are held in the sidelines of the exhibition.
Vocational psychologists such as Greville Booth, Richard Sweet, Raymond Field and James Hand were all past senior psychologists with the New South Wales Vocational Guidance Bureau (VGB).
Encyclopedia of careers and vocational guidance, 14th ed.; 5v.
In 1966, at a national conference for state supervisors of guidance, Hoyt (1967) gave a presentation titled "The Influence of the State Supervisor on the Future of Vocational Guidance." He described three time periods of influence.
The brief comes to a conclusion stating that the Choices in Transition model provides students with disabilities an opportunity to develop a career through postsecondary training and vocational guidance and support.
In 1956, the Cleveland Center was merged with the Vocational Guidance Bureau to become Vocational Guidance and Rehabilitation Services.

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