vocal tract


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vocal tract

the air passages above the glottis (including the pharynx, oral and nasal cavities, and the paranasal sinuses) that contribute to the quality of the voice.

vocal tract

n.
The airway used in the production of speech, especially the passage above the larynx, including the pharynx, mouth, and nasal cavities.

vocal tract

the passages from the glottis through the nose and throat that influence the quality of the voice.

vo·cal tract

(vō'kăl trakt)
The air passages above the glottis (including the pharynx, oral and nasal cavities, and paranasal sinuses) that contribute to the quality of the voice.
References in periodicals archive ?
We measured the cross sectional area of the smallest opening within the vocal tract and the opening distance of the jaw for each vowel articulation.
The second option would be to substitute the voiceless final cognate at the end of the word in order to promote the general vocal tract qualities of the actual word.
Both laryngeal and esophageal speakers have a vocal tract to shape speech sounds and a voice source that may be controlled to a greater or lesser degree.
Chapter five, "Resonating the Voice (Malde)," summarizes the vocal tract, balancing the head, the pharynx, soft palate or velum, the jaw or mandible, the lips, cheeks, tongue, and developing good resonance in the voice.
Both the shape of the vocal tract and the geometry of the lower pharynx contribute to the sound.
CD-ROM includes modules called The Vocal Tract, Speech Sounds, Phonation Modes, Airstream Mechanisms, and Acoustic Analysis, and also includes a
Continuing in this process of reconciling the historical record with modern scientific inquiry, Stark examines the timbral question of chiaroscuro, concluding that singers engage the vocal tract in producing this quality of both "cover" (by lowering the larynx) and brightness (by intensifying the singer's formant).
Because helium is lighter than the usual oxygen/nitrogen blend, it changes the frequency of the vocal tract, causing a faster vibration and a higher-pitched sound.
Because every person's vocal tract is unique, the precise pitch, timbre, and intonation of a person's voice is also unique, and can be used to identify a specific individual.
Mainly physical factors, such as the length of the vocal tract (the distance from the larynx to the lips) and vocal cords.
These modifications of the vocal tract accompany a flexion of the cranial base, which is flatter in primates.