vocal fry


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vo·cal fry

(vō'kal frī),
Phonation at an unnaturally low frequency resulting in low-frequency popping and ticking sounds.
Synonym(s): glottalization

vo·cal fry

(vō'kăl frī)
Phonation at an unnaturally low frequency resulting in low-frequency popping and ticking sounds.
Synonym(s): glottalization.
References in periodicals archive ?
January 2015 This American Life airs a segment on listener complaints about its female hosts' "excruciating" use of vocal fry. "It makes me angry because the biggest users of vocal fry traditionally have been men," linguist Penny Eckert tells NPR.
For instance, they do not want to hear "Maria" from West Side Story performed with vocal fry and riffing.
Vocal fry is the term for when people flutter their vocal chords, producing a low, creeeaaaaaky sound.
Washington, May 29 ( ANI ): A new study indicates that vocal fry, a form of speech that is low in pitch and creaky sounding which is increasingly common among young American women, is actually perceived negatively, particularly in a labor market context.
Foram consideradas todas as notas alcancadas, incluindo o falsete (registro vocal agudo) e excluindo o vocal fry, que e o registro vocal grave, porem de carater aperiodico ((Vargas Costa e Hanayama, 2007).
The third section(Part-C) consisted vocal Symptoms Questionnaire required the participants to circle that statement which was related to their voice use patterns that were appropriate to them included speaking with vocal fry, breathy voice, low pitch speaking voice, shouting & yelling excessively in the classroom, dry or scratchy throat, frequently horse, voice worse in the morning, tightness in throat, frequently clear your throat, frequently sore throat etc.
All of them speak with a great deal of vocal fry (I suspect the male voices were done by the same person), and it would be an improvement if better vocal models were used.
Acoustic, aerodynamic, physiologic, and perceptual properties of modal and vocal fry registers.
IT is WELL ACCEPTED that there are two anchors in voice registration, assuming that vocal fry and whistle voice are not included but treated as separate register categories.
The type of vocal warm up more performed by PG was the sound /s/ and diaphragmatic breathing training, vocal fry, and sustained vowel (Table 6).
'Vocal fry' occurs when a woman lowers her voice so much that you can hear each individual vibration of the vocal folds.
In a nod to the current ubiquitous use of it, Lister specifically states that light opera performers must scrupulously avoid vocal fry. Performers may also be required to use an accent; Lister recommends the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) to shape this specialized pronunciation.