vivisection

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vivisection

 [viv″ĭ-sek´shun]
surgical procedures performed upon a living animal for purpose of physiologic or pathologic investigation.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

viv·i·sec·tion

(viv'i-sek'shŭn),
Any cutting operation on a living animal for purposes of experimentation; often extended to denote any form of animal experimentation.
[vivi- + section]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

vivisection

(vĭv′ĭ-sĕk′shən, vĭv′ĭ-sĕk′-)
n.
The act or practice of cutting into or otherwise injuring living animals for the purpose of scientific research.

viv′i·sec′tion·al adj.
viv′i·sec′tion·al·ly adv.
viv′i·sec′tion·ist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

viv·i·sec·tion

(viv'i-sek'shŭn)
Any cutting operation on a living animal for purposes of experimentation; often extended to denote any form of animal experimentation.
[vivi- + section]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

vivisection

1. Experiments performed on living animals involving surgery.
2. Any scientific work in which live animals are used.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Cumulatively, these efforts of the vivisectionists contributed to a growing acceptance of research conducted on live animals as essential to medical progress.
Dana expressed his opposition to regulation at a time when vivisectionists had cause for concern.
In The Fortnightly Review, John Bridges described the vivisectionist as a kind of "scientific geographer at home" obtaining "precise knowledge of the geographical structure of a country, of the elevation of its plateaux and mountain ranges, of the geological features, and of the average rainfall in different latitudes and longitudes." (21) The country described in this rather improbably extended metaphor is, of course, the inner landscape of the experimental animal, an internal geography which advocates of vivisection in the nineteenth century frequently represented as coterminous with the landscapes which had long been the province of natural historians.
Local residents were alarmed yesterday to discover that the pigs bred at the farm were not destined for the butchers, but were specially bred for vivisectionists.
Vivisectionists, zookeepers, slave-owners, colonizers of one sort or another, have all been concerned with the manipulation (whether that means to preserve, kill, use, instruct, or in some other way to socialize the unsocialized) of the other than the manipulator.
"People are angry that he tried to save animals from suffering and was locked up, while people who carry out animal abuse, such as factory farmers, vivisectionists and hunters, are free to walk the streets."
In my short, undistinguished lifetime I have executed more animals than a vivisectionists' convention.
Vivisectionists won't claim the money because they don't have and can't produce any such evidence.
These days, vivisectionists refuse to debate with me.
A death list of leading vivisectionists has been sent to Scotland Yard and police forces nationwide are on alert.
On national BBC Radio recently I began a live two-hour programme by challenging vivisectionists to phone in with details of any specific medical advance they claimed had been brought about through animal experiments.